Workers

More businesses are folding and leaving laid-off workers in the lurch

The number of businesses going under in South Florida is growing at an alarming rate, cutting the chances for laid-off workers to find other jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to Yelp, the national online business listing firm, nearly 3,000 businesses closed in the tri-county area between March 15 and July 1.

Owners are losing their investments. Employees are losing jobs. And lower income workers — among the most vulnerable to layoffs because they work in hard-hit service industries — are under severe financial pressure as they struggle to find new employment, according to ParentsTogether, a Washington, D.C.-based advocacy group for parents across the country.

In a survey conducted among its Florida members from July 16 to July 19, ParentsTogether found that “a vast majority of families,” including 73% in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, consider themselves to be struggling economically as a direct result of the COVID-19 crisis,

Read More

Live event workers call for federal relief

America’s live event and entertainment businesses came to a screeching halt this year when most states imposed restrictions on large gatherings because of COVID-19. Now, many say their industry feels forgotten, and they need financial relief to survive.

Brad Dunnum has owned ARIA Show Technology in western Michigan since 1999, employing 10 people who provide sound, lighting, video and other services for live events. But the pandemic forced Dunnum to lay all of them off in June.

“We’re not seen or heard a lot because we’re behind the scenes,” Dunnum said. “When nobody notices us that means we’ve done a good job … and because of that, a lot of folks have forgotten about us.”

Nearly 17 million people were employed in the leisure and hospitality industry, which includes the live events industry, at the beginning of 2020, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That number dropped sharply to

Read More

We Asked 15 Laid-Off Restaurant Workers for Their Go-To Homestyle Recipes

Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

From Esquire

Photo credit: Courtesy
Photo credit: Courtesy

The COVID-19 pandemic’s effect on the restaurant and bar business is severe and will be long-lasting. First, back in March and April, a lifetime go, came the layoffs. Millions of them. Waitstaff, bar backs, hosts, dishwashers—no longer needed, no idea how long.

Around that time, Esquire started gathering recipes from laid-off bar and restaurant workers, and the stories behind them. They aren’t chefs—well, one is—but everybody’s gotta eat. The person who served your meal or mixed you a drink a few months ago is most likely dining at home tonight, as you most likely are.

We look forward to the day when we can go to restaurants without caution or fear. In the meantime, here are fifteen recipes and stories from people who lost their jobs in the hospitality industry after their places of business were shut down or hampered by COVID-19.

Read More

PortMiami renegotiates terminal deals, local workers brace for more cruise-less months

Just last November, PortMiami was bustling with construction workers bringing to life five new cruise terminals and two cruise company headquarters. Future cruise business was all but guaranteed: Fiscal year 2020 was set to break the port’s 2019 record of 6.8 million passengers, up 22 percent from 2018.

The county agreed to pay $700 million toward the projects, and the cruise companies — Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, MSC Cruises and Virgin Voyages — agreed to repay the county $5.8 billion over the next 20 to 62 years.

In November, port director Juan Kuryla described the deals as “iron clad.” When asked by the Herald what would happen to the promised return on investment if for some reason cruise ships were only half full or if the ships did not to come to Miami at all, Kuryla said the companies would still be on the

Read More

Contract workers for summer festivals look for job options amid COVID

CBS News is chronicling what has changed for the lives of residents across the nation in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Spring and summer in San Francisco are typically the busiest seasons of the year for Stephanie Mufson. 

Her small business, Parade Guys works with a group of 30 to 40 contractors to create floats and large displays for many of the parades in Northern California. A team of painters, builders, and sculptors would typically be producing floats for events like the San Francisco Pride parade or Fourth of July celebrations.

Stephanie Mufson's small business, Parade Guys, works with a group of 30 to 40 contractors to create floats and large displays for many of the parades in Northern California.
Stephanie Mufson’s small business, Parade Guys, works with a group of 30 to 40 contractors to create floats and large displays for many of the parades in Northern California.

Since large outdoor festivals are being cancelled and celebrations are moving to virtual formats, independent workers who rely heavily on seasonal events are now searching for new ways to make

Read More

Canada’s models show virus slowing but could surge, temporary foreign workers boosting Ontario cases

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 29

2:30 p.m.: Most of Ontario’s case count from temporary foreign workers

Read More

Disneyland postpones July opening as workers threaten to revolt (update)

As coronavirus cases continue to increase, Disney workers and fans are expressing concern about the dangers that reopening the parks may pose. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
As coronavirus cases continue to increase, Disney workers and fans are expressing concern about the dangers that reopening the parks may pose. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

6/24/2020 6:32 p.m. PT UPDATE: Walt Disney Co. announced Wednesday night that Disneyland’s reopening would be delayed past July 17. “The state of California has now indicated that it will not issue theme park reopening guidelines until sometime after July 4. Given the time required for us to bring thousands of cast members back to work and restart our business, we have no choice but to delay the reopenings of our theme parks and resort hotels until we receive approval from government officials.” Company officials said the Downtown Disney District would reopen on July 9 as previously announced. In the same statement, Disney said it has had “positive discussions” with employee unions and had signed agreements with 20 union affiliates.

Here’s the full statement:

We

Read More

How the internet is rallying around Disney workers as parks reopen amid a rise in coronavirus cases

As coronavirus cases continue to increase, Disney workers and fans are expressing concern about the dangers that reopening the parks may pose. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
As coronavirus cases continue to increase, Disney workers and fans are expressing concern about the dangers that reopening the parks may pose. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

Disney World and Disneyland are still scheduled to reopen in early July, despite a surge in COVID-19 cases in Florida and California, where the theme parks are located. And both employees and fans are concerned.

The Florida Department of Public Health revealed earlier this week that the state saw 3,289 new positive COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, bringing the state’s total number of COVID-19 cases to 103,506. In California, public health data revealed that the state saw a whopping 7,149 on Tuesday alone.

As of now, Disney plans to reopen the Downtown Disney District on July 9. After that, the Disneyland and California Adventure theme parks will reopen on July 17, followed by the Grand Californian Hotel & Spa and Disney’s Paradise Pier Hotel on July

Read More

Why Some Remote Workers Might Get Hit by Surprise Taxes

Click here to read the full article.

Following widespread office closures and stay-at-home orders, Americans are now working in new locations, sometimes in new states.

Other front-line workers have traveled to pandemic hot spots to help care for the sick and support the health care response. Still others are providing services, such as telemedicine, remotely.

These new work arrangements could ensnare unsuspecting individuals and businesses in new and complicated tax obligations.

A few states have helped to protect workers by issuing guidance that remote work during the pandemic will be considered in-office work for tax purposes.

However, because so few states have independently moved to protect taxpayers, Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., has proposed a federal bill that would limit states’ ability to tax the income of people temporarily working from a remote location during the pandemic and in the future.

Now is the time for states to step up and

Read More