Trump

DC inspector sent to Trump International Hotel finds no COVID-19-related violations

The investigator was sent following reports of unmasked gatherings.

On Wednesday, after images emerged appearing to show multiple instances of guests not wearing masks on Trump-owned properties, a Washington, D.C. investigator inspected President Donald Trump’s Washington hotel and found no violations related to the coronavirus.

The Alcohol Beverage Regulation Administration said guests and staff were observed to be wearing face masks and coverings in compliance with Mayor Muriel Bowser’s regulations.

The agency said it will continue to monitor the president’s hotel for compliance.

A planned “No Masks Allowed” party scheduled to be held at the D.C. hotel this weekend appears to have been called off following ABC News’ report on the event, according to the Facebook events page which now reads: “This event was canceled.”

Wednesday’s inspection follows a report by ABC News

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Meet Robert Mercer, the conservative billionaire who was a megadonor for Trump during the 2016 campaign but is notably absent in 2020

Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah.
Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah.

Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

  • Robert Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah, were amongst the most prominent conservative megadonors in 2016, extending unwavering support to President Trump.

  • So far, Mercer has only made one six-figure donation to Trump’s reelection campaign.

  • An influential figure in the hedge-fund industry and a computer scientist, Mercer made principal investments in both Breitbart News and Cambridge Analytica in the past.

  • The Mercer Family Foundation and Trump Campaign did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s request for comment.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A billionaire donor who bankrolled President Trump’s 2016 campaign has been notably absent during his reelection efforts.

Robert Mercer, a hedge fund manager, donated upwards of $25 million dollars in the previous election cycle across multiple conservative efforts. So far, Mercer and his daughter, Rebekah, have made a single $355,200 donation to Trump’s reelection effort. 

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Trump cancels in-person Republican convention in Jacksonville, Florida

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Thursday that he will no longer hold a large, in-person Republican convention in Jacksonville, Florida, because of the coronavirus but that he will hold virtual events and still give an acceptance speech.

“I told my team it’s time to cancel the Jacksonville, Florida, component of the GOP convention. We will be starting in North Carolina for the Monday, as has always been planned. We were never taking that off,” Trump said at a news conference at the White House.

Trump said it was “not the right time” for a big convention, adding that he had “to protect the American people.”

“People making travel arrangements all the over the country, they wanted to be there,” Trump said, adding: “I just felt it was wrong to have people going to what turned out to be a hot spot.”

Trump’s plans for Jacksonville appeared to be in

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Kimberly Guilfoyle under fire for Trump fundraising disarray

News that Kimberly Guilfoyle contracted the coronavirus had barely surfaced on July 3 before she hopped on a private flight from Mount Rushmore back to New York with her boyfriend, Donald Trump, Jr.

Left behind in her wake after President Donald Trump’s pre-Independence Day address were more than a half-dozen junior campaign staffers whom Guilfoyle oversees as the president’s national finance chair. The aides, who’d been in proximity to Guilfoyle, were forced to quarantine in their Rapid City, S.D., hotel rooms for three days and barred from face-to-face contact with colleagues as they pleaded with the campaign to get them home.

The campaign tried to reassure the staffers, checking in with them and stressing the need to wait a few days to take a coronavirus test. But the aides felt deserted and scared they’d get sick in a city they’d never set foot in before. They were so distraught that

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Trump and Biden take sharply different paths on immigration

By John Whitesides and Ted Hesson

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump’s push to crack down on illegal immigration and reshape legal immigration was at the heart of the Republican’s winning 2016 campaign and has remained at the forefront of his White House agenda.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, the likely Democratic nominee, promises to rescind many of those policies and advance his own agenda if he wins the Nov. 3 election.

Here is a look at some of their immigration stances.

CORONAVIRUS IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONS

Trump has dramatically curtailed immigration and travel into the United States during the coronavirus pandemic, arguing the steps were needed for health reasons and to protect jobs for U.S. workers.

Earlier this month, his administration announced new rules that could have forced tens of thousands of international students to leave the country if their schools held all classes online amid the pandemic.[nL1N2EE1D6]

In response to

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Trump not ready to commit to election results if he loses

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is refusing to publicly commit to accepting the results of the upcoming White House election, recalling a similar threat he made weeks before the 2016 vote, as he scoffs at polls showing him lagging behind Democrat Joe Biden. Trump says it’s too early to make such an ironclad guarantee.

“I have to see. Look … I have to see,” Trump told moderator Chris Wallace during a wide-ranging interview on ”Fox News Sunday.” “No, I’m not going to just say yes. I’m not going to say no, and I didn’t last time either.” The Biden campaign responded: “The American people will decide this election. And the United States government is perfectly capable of escorting trespassers out of the White House.”

Trump also hammered the Pentagon brass for favoring renaming bases that honor Confederate military leaders — a drive for change spurred by the national debate

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say, as Trump seeks visa restrictions

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

It could also cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

MORE: Harvard, MIT sue Trump administration

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Goya CEO, praising Trump, sparks online culture clash

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The supercharged political landscape in the U.S. has grown even more perilous for companies with the 2020 presidential election looming as Goya, a food company with a tremendously loyal following, has discovered.

The company, which makes many products used on Hispanic cuisine, but whose following extends well outside of that range, is facing a swift backlash after its CEO praised President Donald Trump at a White House event.

Goya was founded in Manhattan in 1936 by Don Prudencio Unanue and his wife Carolina, immigrants from Spain. The company calls itself the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States.

Robert Unanue, a grandson and now Goya CEO, spoke at a Rose Garden event announcing a “Hispanic Prosperity Initiative” on Thursday.

“We all truly blessed, at the same time, to have have a leader like President Trump who is a builder,” Unanue said standing at a

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Joe Biden blasts Trump, offers alternatives to coronavirus response

WILMINGTON, Del. – Joe Biden blasted President Donald Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic Tuesday and announced a plan to control the virus that he said Trump should adopt immediately. 

During a speech at Alexis I. duPont High School in Wilmington, Biden outlined the plan, which includes increased testing and rigorous contact tracing. It follows a road map that Biden released in March which he said would have saved lives had it been adopted.

Biden is also proposing to get more protective supplies to health care workers and provide a more consistent message on the importance of wearing a mask in public.

The former vice president stressed that the virus is still here and the threat to American public health remains.

“COVID-19 will likely worsen,” Biden said. “We need real plans, real guidelines with uniform, nationwide standards to help us chart our economic reopening.”

Joe Biden addresses the media on the coronavirus (COVID-19) at the Hotel DuPont, in Wilmington, De., on Thursday afternoon.
Joe Biden addresses the media on
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