students

Inside Stanford’s Efforts To Welcome MBA Students Back To Campus

As the COVID-19 case count and the death toll from the virus continues to surge in California, plans for the reopening of in-person classes at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business have become increasingly complicated and stubbornly challenging. Shifting state and county guidelines, still-to-be-unveiled university protocols along with the spread of the coronavirus itself have forced the business school to plan for not one but several scenarios this autumn’s forthcoming quarter.

For the core curriculum, the school plans to adopt a hybrid format that will mix in-person and online learning components for most courses. Some classes, however, will be entirely online. But in communicating its plans to both incoming and second-year MBA students, the school is warning all students that its ability to offer any in-person classwork is dependent on both state and county restrictions. “We are hopeful that these restrictions will ease before the quarter begins, but we also acknowledge, … Read More

For college students, taking a gap year might be the best way to outwit coronavirus

Janak Bhakta, 17, from Tustin, had hoped to travel internationally for his gap year, but now he's joining a conservation program this year instead. <span class="copyright">(Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Janak Bhakta, 17, from Tustin, had hoped to travel internationally for his gap year, but now he’s joining a conservation program this year instead. (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)

Janak Bhakta, a soft-spoken 17-year-old from Tustin, had big plans for 2020. He wanted to spend time away from academics to learn, grow and mature by traveling the world. Then the coronavirus pandemic struck and turned those plans to dust.

“The ideal plan was to travel internationally, but obviously that’s not going to happen,” Bhakta says about his planned gap year. He filled out applications for Outward Bound Costa Rica and NOLS Baja, two leading outdoor and leadership organizations, but both programs were canceled due to travel restrictions and health concerns.

Bhakta was still able to find the perfect fit with the Colorado-based High Mountain Institute, which puts gap-year participants in national parks to assist in local conservation efforts.

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say, as Trump seeks visa restrictions

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

It could also cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

MORE: Harvard, MIT sue Trump administration

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Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Fate Of Thousands Of International College Students In CT Unclear

NEW HAVEN, CT —Some 14,000 international students were enrolled in Connecticut colleges in 2019. It was announced by the Trump Administration last week that those students must attend in-person classes or risk losing their visas.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ordered Monday that visa-holding international students at schools where classes are online due to the pandemic will lose their visas and “must depart the country” or “face immigration consequences, including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”

Now, a number of Connecticut colleges and universities are pushing back.

“That policy is senseless and cruel,” said Yale Law School Dean Heather K. Gerken. “It forces students, faculty, and institutions to make a terrible choice, and it creates the possibility that students might have to leave the country at the height of a pandemic simply because public health conditions require a university to go online.”

Many schools plan

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Foreign students weigh studying in person vs. losing visas

PHOENIX (AP) — International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America.

The students from countries as diverse as India, China and Brazil say they are scrambling to devise plans after federal immigration authorities notified colleges this week that international students must leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. Some say they are thinking about returning home or moving to nearby Canada.

“I’m generating research, I’m doing work in a great economy,” said Batuhan Mekiker, a Ph.D. student from Turkey studying computer science at Montana State University in Bozeman. He’s in the third year of a five-year program.

”If I go to Turkey, I would not have that,” he said. “I would like to

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ICE says students taking ‘hybrid’ classes may be able to stay in the US, but it won’t tell colleges what that means

Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.
Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.

Facebook/NYU

  • New guidelines from ICE prevent international students on certain visas from attending schools that are fully online, but may allow them to remain if they’re taking a mixture of online and in-person classes.

  • Many universities have announced they will use a “hybrid model,” combining both in-person and online courses for the upcoming academic year.

  • With “very little information” included in the announcement, however, the new policy lacks clarity in what may be required for a hybrid model, a Senior Legislative and Advocacy Counsel at ACLU told Business Insider.

  • A number of faculty have spoken out on social media that they will offer “1-unit in-person study with any student that faces removal from the country” due to the new policy. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Universities have

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Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Colleges and universities pushed back Wednesday against the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they plan on taking classes entirely online this fall, with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filing a lawsuit to try to block it, and others promising to work with students to keep them on campus.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online.

The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term.

In a statement, the U.S. State

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ICE order leaves foreign students helpless

A new federal immigration directive that threatens the deportation of international college students who take all of their classes online this fall left Florida college administrators scrambling and students panicking about their futures.

The directive issued Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says all students with F-1 or M-1 student visas in the U.S. must go back to their home countries if their courses are entirely online in the fall, a measure many colleges and universities are adopting due to the spread of the coronavirus. Harvard University announced Monday that all of its teaching will be done remotely for the fall semester

The measure is expected to impact at least 1 million students nationwide and more than 10,000 students in the South Florida region, according to ICE officials, local university statistics and College Factual, a New York-based company that gathers college data from the Department of Education.

International students,

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