Safe

Is It Safe To Go Boating During The Coronavirus Pandemic?

Recreational boating has become a popular activity amid the pandemic. (Photo: Cliff Hawkins via Getty Images)
Recreational boating has become a popular activity amid the pandemic. (Photo: Cliff Hawkins via Getty Images)

With traditional summer activities and travel plans largely on hold, people are seeking safe ways to enjoy the season amid the COVID-19 pandemic. One popular approach is recreational boating. 

It’s not just your Instagram feed suggesting that boat trips are all the rage this summer. The data backs it up.

“We’ve seen a huge surge in boat rentals,” Jackie Baumgarten, founder and CEO of peer-to-peer boat rental marketplace Boatsetter, told HuffPost. “Without increasing our marketing, Boatsetter recorded our highest ever booking numbers for the month of June. Peer-to-peer rentals were up 74% compared to the same time last year.”

She also noted that Boatsetter listings have increased 40% as people seek to offset the coast of boat ownership during the recession. Meanwhile, demand has spread beyond traditional boating markets like Florida and Southern California

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Here’s how to stay safe in the water, according to a former lifeguard

According to the CDC, an average of 3,536 people unintentionally drown every year — that’s roughly ten per day.

As a former lifeguard, swim and CPR instructor, I’ve been schooled in the nuances of water safety. Here’s what you need to know to keep your family safe at the lake, beach, and pool this summer.

What does drowning look like?

Unlike what you might see on TV, drowning may not involve screams, thrashing or hand signals. Look for a weak or inefficient kick, attempts to reach for the edge, and neutral or negative buoyancy.

What can you do if you think someone may be drowning? Experts recommend throwing anything that floats to the person. It could be a life jacket, swim noodle, or even an empty cooler with the top closed. 

“This is why ocean lifeguards use rescue buoys and tubes,” explains B. Chris Brewster, Chair of the National Certification

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Is it safe to stay in a hotel amid the coronavirus pandemic?

As travelers slowly begin to get back on the road and in the air amid the coronavirus pandemic, they may be wondering if it’s safe to stay in a hotel. 

Hotels have rolled out a slew of cleaning and safety programs, and last week the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA), the hotel industry’s major trade group, released a checklist for guests who plan to stay in hotels.

“Utilizing these best practices, including requiring face coverings and practicing social distancing in public spaces, will create an even safer environment for all our guests and employees,” Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA, said in a statement. “We applaud governors who have standardized the use of face coverings in all indoor public spaces and we urge all lawmakers to help make this a national standard by implementing this requirement in their states.” 

3 nights, 3 hotels: What it’s really like to

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What airlines are doing to help keep you safe

Because of coronavirus pandemic and the resulting quarantine, the airline industry has taken a major hit. In order to stay above water, most airlines in the U.S. have restructured their schedules and created new guidelines with pandemic safety in mind, in order to make potential travelers feel more confident to get on board. As of mid-July, domestic flights have been flying at about 50 percent seating capacity, but there are some airlines who have thrown caution to the wind and are still flying packed. If we choose to fly right now, how safe we feel will depend on each airline’s unique approach (if any at all) to social distancing, cleaning, and capacity. Here are the safety measures 6 major U.S. airlines currently have in place that might help you decide if you want to take the risk.

Southwest Airlines

I hold a special place in my heart for Southwest Airlines,

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What’s Safe To Do Right Now? The Most Common COVID-19 Questions, Answered

With states in various stages of reopening, coronavirus cases are increasing across the country. And without standardized guidelines on how we’re supposed to behave, everyone seems to be living by their own rules.

Many of us are wondering: What is actually safe to do right now? Is it safe to fly or stay at a hotel? What about a road trip? Can you go to the dentist, restaurant or gym? 

HuffPost hosted a COVID-19 Q&A with Dr. Kavita Patel, HuffPost’s medical contributor and a practicing internal medicine physician in Washington, D.C., and Lindsay Holmes, HuffPost’s senior wellness editor, to get answers during this confusing time. Below are the most common questions readers asked during the event and some guidance on what to do:

Is it safe to go to restaurants right now? 

Patel: While there have been no reported cases of contracting the virus from prepared food, there have

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Take These Steps for Safe Swimming

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

While experts consider waterborne transmission of the novel coronavirus to be unlikely, swimming at the local neighborhood pool or municipal beachfront might not be a simple option.

Some cities have said they’re keeping public pools closed. And in some communities in the U.S., “closed” may mean that a beach or lakefront is accessible but not staffed with lifeguards, so you might not have these professionals watching as you and your family swim. 

Where pools and beaches are open, authorities are likely to be implementing rules designed to limit any potential spread of COVID-19, such as social distancing. That could limit the number of people allowed to swim, shutting some families out. 

To avoid these problems, and provide kids with a way to have some warm-weather fun, some people may be exploring their options for backyard swimming, such as above-ground

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EU puts 14 countries on ‘safe list’, but excludes the US

Canada made the list of 14 safe non-EU countries - Getty
Canada made the list of 14 safe non-EU countries – Getty

The EU has announced 14 countries whose citizens can be let into the bloc from July 1, but the US, China and Brazil have been left off the list.

The list includes Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco and South Korea. The EU has suggested it will add China once the Chinese government offers a reciprocal deal for EU travellers.

Border controls have been lifted inside the EU, meaning you can travel freely between countries once inside.

Also on the safe list are Algeria, Georgia, Montenegro, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. The list will be finalised by midday today.

Anyone from the UK will be treated in the same way as EU citizens until the end of the Brexit transition process, on December 31. 

However, the Foreign Office still advises against travel and anyone arriving in the UK

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Is it safe to travel to Spain this summer? Latest Foreign Office advice and restrictions

Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock
Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock

As countries around the globe tentatively begin to relax restrictions on travel, the promise of tapas al fresco and long, lazy sun-filled days beside the sea come top of the travel wish-list for many tourists.

Spain has long topped the list as one of the UK’s favourite holiday destinations, with more than 18 million British tourists visiting in 2019 – a fifth of the country’s overall total of nearly 84 million visitors, according to figures from the National Institute of Statistics.

But can British holidaymakers get there? And will we be welcome if we do?

Here’s all the information you need to know.

Am I allowed to travel to Spain from the UK?

At the moment, the Foreign Office is advising against all non-essential international travel – including to Spain.

The ban was initially put in place to avoid Britons getting stuck abroad as

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Traveling this summer? These 12 things will keep you safe and comfortable

12 things you need for safe travel during the coronavirus pandemic
12 things you need for safe travel during the coronavirus pandemic

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission. 

As states lift their stay-at-home orders after months of quarantine, more and more people are beginning to venture out. But they aren’t just heading to the grocery store or the gym—some people are starting to travel again, as well.

Whether it be for business or pleasure, traveling during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic isn’t the same as it was before all of this began. Not only are airports, airlines, and other public transportation companies instituting new rules and cleaning procedures, but travelers themselves must also be prepared with the right essentials to stay safe and prevent any further spread of the virus. 

If you have plans to travel in the near future, we’ve rounded up 12 things to help you stay

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Is It Safe To Take An Uber, Lyft Or Taxi During Coronavirus?

There are important factors to keep in mind and ways to mitigate the risks when it comes to taking a taxi or rideshare service during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: martin-dm via Getty Images)
There are important factors to keep in mind and ways to mitigate the risks when it comes to taking a taxi or rideshare service during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: martin-dm via Getty Images)

As more businesses reopen and people emerge from their homes with greater frequency, there’s a sense that things are getting back to “normal.” Many folks are easing into activities from their pre-pandemic lives, like dining at a restaurant, booking air travel and even taking an Uber.

But are rideshare services like Uber and Lyft ― or even traditional taxis ― safe for passengers amid the COVID-19 pandemic?

“Although it doesn’t feel as scary as it used to be, we are nowhere near the end of this pandemic,” said Kit Delgado, an assistant professor or emergency medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. “As of today we are still identifying more than 20,000 new cases of COVID-19

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