rules

New UK quarantine rules shake up summer travel plans

The Lunt family from Bath, in western England, had planned to visit Spain this summer but like so many British holidaymakers have had their plans upended by the coronavirus pandemic.

The family-of-five, who had booked two weeks on the Balearic island of Majorca next month, are now headed to Rock, an upmarket resort in the southwest English county Cornwall dubbed “Chelsea-on-Sea” after the wealthy London suburb.

They finally decided to swap the azure waters of the Mediterranean for the cooler currents of the North Atlantic amid growing fears about a second wave of COVID-19 sweeping Europe.

Initially, the family were worried they might test positive for the virus on arrival in Spain and have to spend their holiday in self-isolation, before the British government abruptly imposed its own quarantine.

“We were worried about having our temperature taken at the airport and potentially having to quarantine for two weeks,” Rosie Lunt,

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The ultimate guide to coverings as England’s rules change on Friday

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

It was recently announced that from 24 July, face coverings will be mandatory in all shops and supermarkets in England. People who don’t wear one will face a fine of up to £100, apart from people with medical conditions and children under 11.

If you’re picking up a takeaway coffee or food in England, you’ll also have to wear a mask, but this rule doesn’t apply to sit-in meals. The Northern Ireland secretary, Brandon Lewis, confirmed: “If you’re going in to buy a takeaway, and leaving

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Am I allowed to visit, are hotels and restaurants open and what rules are in place?

Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock
Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock

As countries around the globe tentatively begin to relax restrictions on travel, the promise of tapas al fresco and long, lazy sun-filled days beside the sea come top of the travel wish-list for many tourists.

Spain has long topped the list as one of the UK’s favourite holiday destinations, with more than 18 million British tourists visiting in 2019 – a fifth of the country’s overall total of nearly 84 million visitors, according to figures from the National Institute of Statistics.

But can British holidaymakers get there? And will we be welcome?

Here’s all the information you need to know.

Am I allowed to travel to Spain from the UK?

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued a blanket warning against all non-essential international travel in March, but this has now been lifted for 67 destinations as of 4 July.

Spain was on this

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Boris Johnson updates public transport rules

Happier times: a Thameslink train at Blackfriars: Thameslink
Happier times: a Thameslink train at Blackfriars: Thameslink

Boris Johnson has announced that, as of 1 August, the government’s advice that anyone who is able should work from home will be relaxed.

From that date, it will be at employers’ discretion whether they allow people to continue working remotely or require them to come back into the office.

“Instead of government telling people to work from home, we’re going to give employers more discretion and ask them to make decisions about how their staff can work safely,” said the Prime Minister.

“That could mean, of course, continuing to work from home – which is one way of working safely and which has worked for many employers and employees – or it could mean making workplaces safe by following Covid-secure guidelines.”

But what does this mean for the rules around public transport use? Here’s everything you need to know.

Can I

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Everything you need to know as England changes rules

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

It was announced yesterday that from 24 July, face coverings will be mandatory in all shops and supermarkets in England. People who don’t wear one will face a fine of up to £100, apart from people with medical conditions and children under 11.

Since 15 June, it has been mandatory in England to wear them when travelling by train, Tube, bus, ferry or plane.

Sir Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the UK’s national science academy said on 7 July that everyone should carry a face covering when

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Everything you need to know as Wales changes rules

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

Since 15 June, it has been mandatory in England to wear them when travelling by train, Tube, bus, ferry or plane. Failure to follow these rules can result in a £100 fine, but those under the age of 11 and people with disabilities or breathing problems, or anyone travelling with someone who lip-reads are exempt from wearing them though.

There has been wide criticism over the government’s recommendation to wear a face covering on public transport only.

Sir Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the UK’s national science

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Everything you need to know as Scotland changes rules

We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock
We have all your questions about face masks answered including how to wash them, masks for children and where to buy them: iStock

The coronavirus pandemic has meant that face masks and coverings will become part of daily life. The UK government and the World Health Organisation (WHO) have both advised wearing face coverings in a bid to reduce the infection transmission of Covid-19.

Since 15 June, it has been mandatory in England to wear them when travelling by train, Tube, bus, ferry or plane. Failure to follow these rules can result in a £100 fine, but those under the age of 11 and people with disabilities or breathing problems, or anyone travelling with someone who lip-reads are exempt from wearing them though.

There has been wide criticism over the government’s recommendation to wear a face covering on public transport only.

Sir Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the UK’s national science

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Everything you need to know about travelling abroad this summer, following changes to quarantine rules

Summer holidays abroad could be back on but what will they look like? (Getty Images)
Summer holidays abroad could be back on but what will they look like? (Getty Images)

Back in June when the government announced the introduction of strict travel measures that would mean anyone arriving from abroad would have to isolate for 14 days, we saw our summer holiday hopes fade quicker than our post-holiday tans.

But summer 2020 could well be back on, with the arrival of travel corridors and a long list of countries now exempt from England’s stringent quarantine rules.

From 10 July, anyone arriving from the countries listed will not have to isolate for 14 days on arrival into England.

“The government is satisfied that it is now safe to ease these measures in England and has introduced travel corridor exemptions for some countries and territories,” the new guidance states.

Additionally, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), which previously advised against all but essential travel, has now updated

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Airlines end row with government over quarantine rules

Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty

British Airways (IAG.L), easyJet (EZJ.L) and Ryanair (RYAAY) will end a legal challenge against the UK government after it announced certain countries would be exempt from its quarantine rule.

Europe’s top airlines were worried the rule, implemented 8 June, would deter British holidaymakers from travelling, for fear of having to quarantine for 14 days upon return.

All passengers – bar a handful of exemptions – have to fill out an online locator form giving their contact and travel details, as well as the address of where they will isolate.

People who failed to comply were told they could be fined £1,000 ($1248.40) and police were allowed to use “reasonable force” to make sure the rules were followed.

The airlines had taken action against Health Secretary Matt Hancock over measures they said would have a “severe impact on the travel and tourism industry,” which was “already running on fumes.”

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Supreme Court rules generic website names can be trademarked

The USPTO, among others, suggested that allowing Booking.com to claim the trademark would harm other travel companies with the word “booking” in their domain names. Federal trademark law defines generic terms as those that don’t make a service or product distinct from other ones. It prevents companies from staking an exclusive claim to commonly used words such as “tailor” or “laundromat” in store names.

Booking.com claimed that people associate its brand with reservations and that denying its trademark application could lead to consumers becoming misled. In writing the Supreme Court’s majority opinion, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sided with the company, suggesting that public perception of a name is the core issue. 

“[If] Booking.com were generic, we might expect consumers to understand Travelocity — another such service — to be a Booking.com,” Ginsburg wrote. “We might similarly expect that a consumer, searching for a trusted source of online hotel-reservation services, could

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