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Coronavirus child care pinch in U.S. poses threat to economic gains of working women

By Jonnelle Marte and Rachel Dissell

CLEVELAND (Reuters) – Most days, Zora Pannell works from her dining room table, sitting in front of her computer, turning off the video on Zoom calls to nurse her one-year-old daughter, Savannah.

Pannell has balanced working from home and caring for her daughter and son Timothy, aged 2, since March when she started a new job as a manager for a language services company the same week that Ohio issued a “stay at home” order to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Working from home is an exhausting daily juggle but she’s more worried about being told it’s time to return to the office. Her husband cannot watch the children during the day because he has a job at a local steel mill and the couple have been unable to find a daycare center they deemed safe and affordable close to their Shaker Heights

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Virus poses cultural threat to Brazil’s Amazon people

Amajari (Brasil) (AFP) – In the heart of the Brazilian Amazon, the advance of COVID-19 presents indigenous people with a cruel cultural dilemma — remain in their villages with little medical help, or seek safety in the city and risk being deprived of their ancestral funeral rites.

Lucita Sanoma lost her two-month-old baby to suspected coronavirus on May 25. The boy was buried, without her knowledge, 300 kilometers (185 miles) from her village.

The infant died in hospital in Boa Vista, capital of the northwestern state of Roraima.

The burial followed government health guidelines that run counter to Yanomami culture, which dictates that the deceased must be cremated.

The authorities “have to understand and respect the cultural issue,” indigenous leader Mauricio Yekuana told AFP, outraged at the suffering of the young mother and three other women with similar experiences.

As part of the Yanomami’s funerary rites, the remains are displayed

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