Plan

Chicago offers hybrid plan for return to school

CHICAGO — Most Chicago children would return to the classroom two days a week and spend the other three days learning remotely once the school year begins, under a tentative plan outlined Friday.

Chicago Public Schools officials called the hybrid approach a preliminary framework and asked parents, students and staff of nation’s third-largest school district to weigh in.

A final decision about in-person instruction for fall classes won’t come until late August, with classes set to begin Sept. 8.

“We have to be ready for any possibility,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot said. “COVID-19 has been unpredictable from the start and we have a responsibility to be prepared for what the public health indicators dictate, whether that means remote learning, in-person learning or something in between.”

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Atlanta mayor questions timing of Gov. Kemp lawsuit.

— Nearly 10,000 African health workers

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How will the L.A. Phil carry on amid COVID-19? Dudamel and Smith lay out a plan

A "What's Next" banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. <span class="copyright">(Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A “What’s Next” banner with Gustavo Dudamel at Walt Disney Concert Hall. (Mark Swed / Los Angeles Times)

“What’s Next” looms large in the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s posters for its 2019-20 season. They are still up at Walt Disney Concert Hall, and they can seem more like a question now that the orchestra on Thursday confirmed the inevitable cancellation of concerts for the rest of the year.

Originally, of course, “What’s Next” was meant as an answer to the question of what could possibly follow the L.A. Phil’s unprecedented, epic centennial season, which confirmed its position as the world’s most artistically venturesome and socially committed major orchestra. But the COVID-19 pandemic turned out to be the answer no one planned for, L.A. Phil Chief Executive Chad Smith said in a Zoom interview in which he was joined by Music and Artistic Director Gustavo Dudamel. They talked about plans they want

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Nick Offerman’s 5-Step Plan to Get Into Woodworking

There is perhaps no more telling anecdote about the murky distinction between Nick Offerman, the actor, and Ron Swanson, the fictional Director of the Pawnee City Department of Parks and Recreation he played on Parks and Recreation, than the parting gifts bestowed on the cast and crew shortly after the series ended in 2015. 

A little less than a year after the final curtain, series co-creator Mike Schur took to Twitter to reveal that Offerman had carved elegant canoe paddles with the Pawnee City crest emblazoned on them for the entire cast and crew — paddles that were made from wood Offerman had salvaged from the rubble that once was the Parks & Rec set.  

It was both a heartfelt tribute to a beloved character, and a testament to how deeply Offerman loves the craft of woodworking. Offerman’s father and uncles had instilled in him a love of woodwork

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Carnival cruise lines plan ‘staggered’ comeback, won’t return to full capacity until 2022

Cruise giant Carnival Corp. is continuing plans for a phased-in approach for its return to sailing, beginning with fewer ships and fewer passengers, on a region-by-region basis. The company will not make a full return in terms of passenger capacity until 2022 at the earliest, according to CEO Arnold Donald.

 “[The] nature of restart is going to be almost country by country and destination by destination,” Donald said on an earnings call Friday, four months after the company paused operations due to coronavirus. 

Carnival Corp.’s restart will mimic international reopenings.

The resumption of shoreside social gathering practices will be the “critical thing” as an indicator for the resumption of cruising. He pointed to Germany, where one Carnival subsidiary, AIDA Cruises will resume sailing three of its ships in August after the country began to reopen in the spring. Italy, he suggested, might be next. 

AIDA’s three scheduled cruises will not

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Cornell pushes ahead with reopening plan

Universities are confronting the difficult decision on whether to reopen in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic, while trying to grapple with the financial pain brought about by state lockdowns.

Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y., is slated to reopen its doors to around 15,000 undergraduate students on Sept. 2. To prepare, the school has spent between $3 million and $5 million on testing, tracing and isolation.

“The biggest thing that we’re going to do is to do surveillance testing,” Cornell Provost Michael Kotlikoff told Yahoo Finance’s On The Move. “We think that’s the key thing that colleges need to do to be able to assure safety in public health.” 

Identifying individuals — even those without symptoms of COVID-19 — and isolating them allows the school to control the spread of the virus, Kotlikoff said.

But testing 24,000 people (total Cornell population) individually is not an easy task — it’s expensive

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How to Plan and Save for Your Wedding During the Pandemic, According to Experts

PEOPLE’s Real Tips for Real Life presents practical answers to some of the most commonly asked questions around finance, employment and preparing for the future — even when that future can seem very uncertain.

Almost every big wedding this year has been rescheduled for 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic’s devastating impact on the world, celebrity wedding expert Colin Cowie tells PEOPLE.

“I’m telling couples to get engaged now — and wait,” says the party planner, whose A-list clientele includes Oprah Winfrey and Ryan Seacrest. “The idea of a socially distanced wedding with people standing 10-feet apart, I don’t find anything exciting or glamorous about that.”

Couples were “extremely and bitterly disappointed” at the idea of postponing their weddings, Cowie says. But after he explained what would have to be done to follow CDC guidelines and ensure everyone’s safety, all of Cowie’s clients elected to wait.

“A wedding is a

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Jack Ma’s New Chieftain Lays Out Plan to Fend Off Tencent

(Bloomberg) —

Billionaire Jack Ma’s newest chieftain is accelerating Alipay’s evolution into an online mall for everything from loans and travel services to food delivery, in a bid to claw back shoppers lost to Tencent Holdings Ltd.

Ant Group Chief Executive Simon Hu is aggressively pitching digital payment and cloud offerings to the local arms of KFC Holding Co. and Marriott International Inc., expanding the firm’s focus from banks and fund managers on its ubiquitous app.

The Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. affiliate’s strategy is two-pronged. It halts Tencent and food delivery giant Meituan Dianping’s run-away success in attracting local merchants to their platforms, eroding Ant’s dominance of China’s $29 trillion mobile payments space. It also diversifies Ant’s business into less-sensitive areas after the firm drew regulatory scrutiny for its blistering expansion in financial services with in-house products.

“We want to help digitize the services industry,” said Hu in his first

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Jack Ma’s New Chieftain Lays Out His Plan to Fend Off Tencent

(Bloomberg) —

Billionaire Jack Ma’s newest chieftain is accelerating Alipay’s evolution into an online mall for everything from loans and travel services to food delivery, in a bid to claw back shoppers lost to Tencent Holdings Ltd.

Ant Group Chief Executive Simon Hu is aggressively pitching digital payment and cloud offerings to the local arms of KFC Holding Co. and Marriott International Inc., expanding the firm’s focus from banks and fund managers on its ubiquitous app.

The Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. affiliate’s strategy is two-pronged. It halts Tencent and food delivery giant Meituan Dianping’s run-away success in attracting local merchants to their platforms, eroding Ant’s dominance of China’s $29 trillion mobile payments space. It also diversifies Ant’s business into less-sensitive areas after the firm drew regulatory scrutiny for its blistering expansion in financial services with in-house products.

“We want to help digitize the services industry,” said Hu in his first

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Everything You Need to Know About the NBA’s Big Plan to Return This Summer

It was a long, strange spring for sports fans. And you can only imagine how it felt for the athletes who were supposed to be focused on competing, training and/or negotiating new deals, and not a heck of a lot else. 

After the NBA abruptly suspended its season on March 11 when Utah Jazz player Rudy Gobert tested positive for COVID-19, with five weeks to go before the playoffs were supposed to begin, the dominoes fell quickly. Within a few weeks practically everything else in the wide world of sports was subsequently shut down or canceled, from March Madness and the Little League World Series to horse racing’s Triple Crown and the 2020 Summer Olympics, with just about every level of competition in between snuffed out as reported cases of the novel coronavirus started to multiply.

Suffice it to say, league officials, organizers and players from all over the world,

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