International

DC inspector sent to Trump International Hotel finds no COVID-19-related violations

The investigator was sent following reports of unmasked gatherings.

On Wednesday, after images emerged appearing to show multiple instances of guests not wearing masks on Trump-owned properties, a Washington, D.C. investigator inspected President Donald Trump’s Washington hotel and found no violations related to the coronavirus.

The Alcohol Beverage Regulation Administration said guests and staff were observed to be wearing face masks and coverings in compliance with Mayor Muriel Bowser’s regulations.

The agency said it will continue to monitor the president’s hotel for compliance.

A planned “No Masks Allowed” party scheduled to be held at the D.C. hotel this weekend appears to have been called off following ABC News’ report on the event, according to the Facebook events page which now reads: “This event was canceled.”

Wednesday’s inspection follows a report by ABC News

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say, as Trump seeks visa restrictions

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

It could also cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

MORE: Harvard, MIT sue Trump administration

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Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

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Teladoc Health, Zoom Video Communications, Amazon, Costco Wholesale and Fiverr International

For Immediate Release

Chicago, IL – July 13, 2020 – Zacks.com announces the list of stocks featured in the Analyst Blog. Every day the Zacks Equity Research analysts discuss the latest news and events impacting stocks and the financial markets. Stocks recently featured in the blog include: Teladoc Health, Inc. TDOC, Zoom Video Communications, Inc. ZM, Amazon AMZN, Costco Wholesale COST and Fiverr International FVRR.

Here are highlights from Friday’s Analyst Blog:

Investing in the “New Normal”: 3 Major Trends That Are Here to Stay

With the recent relaxation of lockdown guidelines followed by mass reopening of a number of states, the nation’s daily new case tally is on the rise again. The last three months’ data had shown a slowdown in new cases, bringing a glimmer of hope. However, the past seven days’ data shows a record increase in the number of new cases.

The catastrophic impact of the

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Fate Of Thousands Of International College Students In CT Unclear

NEW HAVEN, CT —Some 14,000 international students were enrolled in Connecticut colleges in 2019. It was announced by the Trump Administration last week that those students must attend in-person classes or risk losing their visas.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) ordered Monday that visa-holding international students at schools where classes are online due to the pandemic will lose their visas and “must depart the country” or “face immigration consequences, including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings.”

Now, a number of Connecticut colleges and universities are pushing back.

“That policy is senseless and cruel,” said Yale Law School Dean Heather K. Gerken. “It forces students, faculty, and institutions to make a terrible choice, and it creates the possibility that students might have to leave the country at the height of a pandemic simply because public health conditions require a university to go online.”

Many schools plan

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Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students

BOSTON (AP) — Colleges and universities pushed back Wednesday against the Trump administration’s decision to make international students leave the country if they plan on taking classes entirely online this fall, with Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology filing a lawsuit to try to block it, and others promising to work with students to keep them on campus.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement notified colleges Monday that international students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. New visas will not be issued to students at those schools, and others at universities offering a mix of online and in-person classes will be barred from taking all of their classes online.

The guidance says international students won’t be exempt even if an outbreak forces their schools online during the fall term.

In a statement, the U.S. State

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International Students in the U.S. Could Face ‘Devastating Upheaval’ in Wake of ICE Guidance for Foreign Students to Leave if Schools Are Online-Only

On her birthday, Justine learned that her future as a student in the U.S., and the futures of hundreds of thousands of international students like her — may be in jeopardy. New federal guidance announced Monday that international students will be required to leave the U.S. if their schools switch to an all-online curriculum amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students already residing in the U.S. have been thrust into panic and uncertainty. “We’ve uprooted our entire lives to be here,” Justine says. She asked for her full name to be withheld because of fears about her immigration status. “The fact that it’s not coordinated and it’s not consistent messaging is very distressing for us and for our families.”

The new U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) guidance, states that international students on F-1 and M-1 visas “may not take a full online course load and remain” in the U.S. — posing

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ICE says international students could be deported if their classes go online

As the coronavirus pandemic forces colleges nationwide to assess the risks of bringing students back to campus in the fall, the fate of thousands of international students could be hanging in the balance.

On Monday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that international students pursuing degrees in the U.S. will have to leave the country under the threat of deportation if their university switches to online-only classes. ICE’s release says that the State Department will not issue visas to any student taking a fully online course load, and if in-person classes are not an option at a certain university, it recommends that students who wish to remain in the country transfer to a school that offers them.

Though visa requirements have always been strict, and online-only courseloads have always been prohibited for international students coming to the U.S., ICE’s move to more-or-less ignore the extraordinary circumstances of the pandemic still

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How affordable international airline travel could bounce back after the pandemic

A man who has arrived from New York City on an Aeroflot - Russian Airlines flight, pushes a luggage cart at the arrivals area of Sheremetyevo International Airport.
A man who has arrived from New York City on an Aeroflot – Russian Airlines flight, pushes a luggage cart at the arrivals area of Sheremetyevo International Airport.

Sergei BobylevTASS via Getty Images

The past decade and change has seen a remarkable phenomenon in the air-travel market: airline revenue and profits soared, but international flights became cheaper than ever.

Years ago, it was rare to find cheap flights to Europe, barring promotions or pricing errors.

But in recent years, inexpensive flights have become the norm. Even before the rollout of basic economy class, flights from the US to Europe and South America and Asia could routinely be found in the low hundreds of dollars. And passengers could book flights to Asia, the Middle East, and Africa for just a little more.

The lowest fares might not always be available on the busiest travel days or throughout peak seasons and booking

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