Industry

Opinion: California Tourism Industry Supports Safe, Responsible Travel Amid COVID

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La Jolla
Tourists from throughout the country are drawn to California’s spectacular coastline like this woman viewing the surf in La Jolla. Photo by Chris Stone

By Gene Zanger | Special for CalMatters

To those who’ve heard it, the history of the Zanger family business represents the quintessential American success story: Italian immigrant family prospers through decades of hard work, innovation and luck.

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Generations of my family worked for years to build Casa de Fruta from a seasonal cherry stand to a multi-dimensional road-trip traveler’s paradise. My grandmother Clara provided the innovation: “Build a restroom and travelers will stop.” She was right. The luck? Turns out that little cherry stand on Pacheco Pass was between Monterey and Yosemite and in the middle of the two major north-south corridors between San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Like all California businesses

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Travel industry fears Covid-19 crisis will cause more holiday companies to collapse



a close up of a sign: Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Luke Dray/Getty Images

The travel sector is bracing itself for the collapse of yet more holiday companies as businesses continue to struggle to meet the challenges of the Covid-19 crisis.

Several longstanding travel companies have failed during the pandemic, among them touring company Shearings in May and round-the-world ticket specialist STA in August. On Monday, Cities Direct ceased trading. It had been operating for 20 years.

Industry bosses have voiced concerns about the closure of the government’s furlough scheme at the end of October, as well as the ongoing slump in overseas bookings, a double whammy that may be the death knell of more businesses. In a statement issued by the Association of Independent Tour Operators (Aito) – of which Cities Direct was a member – executive director Martyn Sumners said many formerly vibrant companies are now in desperate straits because of the pandemic.

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Tourism Industry Faces $1 Trillion Loss, 100 Million Jobs At Risk From Covid-19, UN Reports

TOPLINE

A new policy brief from the United Nations outlining Covid-19’s impact on the tourism industry projects the pandemic will cost the tourism industry approximately $1 trillion in losses and threaten more than 100 million jobs worldwide, underlining how the ongoing global crisis has devastated one of the world’s largest industries.

KEY FACTS

International tourist numbers are projected to decline by between 58% and 78% from 2019 to 2020, the UN reports, which would result in a drop of 850 million to 1.1 billion tourists.

The expected loss in export revenues from international tourism is $910 billion to $1.2 trillion; $320 billion has already been lost in the first months of 2020, which is more than three times the loss

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What sort of future does the conference industry have?

“I’m devastated,” says Mike Walker, managing director of MGN Events.

The company went from generating millions of pounds in revenue to near zero in just weeks, because of lockdowns.

“Over 10 years of hard work building the company up from nothing, reinvesting each year for growth, taken away cruelly in the space of a couple of weeks, with no clarity on when the industry can resume,” Mr Walker says.

Thousands of others in the events industry will be facing the same uncertainty. The pandemic has completely shattered a huge sector, and many businesses are struggling to survive. According to a 2018 report, business events alone are a $1.5 trillion (£1.2tn) industry globally.

That’s without considering the huge number of consumer events, exhibitions, experiences and weddings.

Mike Walker saw the income of his events firm wiped out due to coronavirus

All of these events rely on people turning up in

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How Covid-19 hit the comedy industry

For comedian Ayo Edebiri the coronavirus pandemic has been no laughing matter – in more ways than one.

People losing their lives to a deadly virus – or Black Lives Matter protests in the wake of the shocking death of George Floyd – hardly provided rich picking for jokes.

And then there was the problem with comedy venues closing en masse during lockdown. Back in March she correctly predicted to a Los Angeles audience that her stand-up gig that night was likely to be her last for a while.

Lockdowns meant venues around the world where stand-ups would perform had to shut down – thousands of performances were cancelled.

‘Financial freefall’

For London-based comedian Kate Smurthwaite, this meant a £16,000 loss in bookings – a mixture of stand-up performances, festivals, teaching and workshops – throughout the year.

Also, many travel and accommodation fees were paid in advance, and it hasn’t

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Ryanair boss declares airline is ‘beacon’ for aviation industry on coronavirus refunds

Stormy skies: a Ryanair Boeing 737 taking off from Gatwick, destination Dublin: Simon Calder
Stormy skies: a Ryanair Boeing 737 taking off from Gatwick, destination Dublin: Simon Calder

Europe’s biggest budget airline says it is “a beacon” for the aviation industry in the way it is handling passenger refunds.

Ryanair has been the subject of widespread criticism for delays in returning money for flights cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic.

But Eddie Wilson, chief executive of the airline’s main brand Ryanair DAC, has told The Independent: “We have given out close to €750m in vouchers and in cash refunds.

“I would say actually we’re a beacon, we’re doing it right. We are making our way through this, we are giving regular updates.

“There’s up to 30 million journeys that were cancelled. It is truly extraordinary.”

Under European air passengers’ rights rules, airlines that cancel flights are supposed to refund the fare within a week. But Mr Wilson said that deadline is unachievable.

“Nobody

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Michigan tourism industry says this is “a year simply to survive”

CBS News is chronicling what has changed for the lives of residents across the nation in 2020 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Heidi Gesiakowski and her husband Joel opened Taste, a small plates and martini restaurant, in South Haven, a beach town on the eastern shores of Lake Michigan, in 2013.

When the coronavirus pandemic struck, Taste could only offer takeout service for several weeks and revenue took a hit. Business started to pick back up to more normal levels in June when dine-in service could resume at half capacity. It came just as the critical summer tourism season was starting for small businesses like Taste in towns like South Haven across Michigan’s two peninsulas. “It really feels like we’re walking into the middle of the war every single day, just trying to tread, keep our head above water,” Gesiakowski said.  Taste normally makes about half of its revenue between June

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25 Ways the Coronavirus Has Upended the Auto Industry Across the Globe

As soon as news broke that life would be put on pause to battle the novel coronavirus, nearly every industry was affected. The automotive market in particular — both on the production and purchasing sides — had to alter its mode of operations almost entirely.

Now, with plants and auto dealerships reopening, the world is witnessing the future of the car production and purchasing process. Discover the ways in which the industry has and continues to change.

Last updated: June 24, 2020

Car Sales Will Decrease Globally

Globally, the auto sector already experienced a downturn in 2019 — and the coronavirus has only made it that much more difficult for the industry to recover. According IHS Markit, it is estimated that global automobile sales will decline by about 22% overall this year.

Initially, the disruption in supply and manufacturing hindered the industry significantly. Now, the decline in demand has led

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British tourism industry rejoices as hotels and campsites will reopen on July 4

hotel - getty
hotel – getty

As of July 4, “most leisure and tourist attractions will reopen if they can do safely,” Boris Johnson has announced, revealing the biggest return of freedoms to Britain since lockdown.

The two-metre rule has been cut to one, in a major boon for pubs and restaurants, which will also be permitted to reopen from July 4. “All hospitality indoors will be limited to table service with minimal staff to customer contact,” he said.

Hotels, holiday apartments, caravan parks and campsites will be allowed to operate, as long as shared facilities are kept clean, as well as cinemas, arcades and theme parks, but swimming pools and spas “need to remain closed for now.”

The news comes as a huge relief for the UK hospitality industry, and for many campsite and holiday park owners, who feared that strict rules surrounding the use of shared facilities such as toilets and

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Tourism Industry: Everything You Need to Know About Tourism

The tourism industry, also known as the travel industry, is linked to the idea of people travelling to other locations, either domestically or internationally, for leisure, social or business purposes. It is closely connected to the hotel industry, the hospitality industry and the transport industry, and much of it is based around keeping tourists happy, occupied and equipped with the things they need during their time away from home.

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Extra: How the Coronavirus Pandemic Has Impacted the Tourism Industry

What is the Tourism Industry?

So, what is the tourism industry? First, it is important to define what is meant by the ‘tourism industry’. Essentially, it refers to all activity related to the short-term movement of people to locations away from where they usually reside. It is one of the world’s largest industries and the economies of many nations are driven, to a large extent, by their tourist trade.

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