Hotels

Is it worth it to bundle flights and hotels? Here’s what to know as you start traveling again

The coronavirus pandemic caused an unprecedented need for consumers to cancel travel plans. Many travelers have encountered frustration changing arrangements, canceling trips and obtaining refunds.

Some consumers prefer to handle each part of their travel on a piecemeal basis.  But if you end up having to cancel or make changes, it can be a hassle to contact every hospitality company individually.

For other travelers, a vacation package tidies up the process and creates a single-point contact but their policies may be restrictive regarding cancellation and refunds.

We’ve consulted with travel experts who share the pros and cons of bundling arrangements for your next trip:

The argument for bundling

Cost can be lower: When flights and hotels are booked together, travelers can achieve better prices. “From purely a financial perspective, a bundled vacation package can help you to secure the best prices and keep costs down,” says Matt Woodley, founder of

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British tourism industry rejoices as hotels and campsites will reopen on July 4

hotel - getty
hotel – getty

As of July 4, “most leisure and tourist attractions will reopen if they can do safely,” Boris Johnson has announced, revealing the biggest return of freedoms to Britain since lockdown.

The two-metre rule has been cut to one, in a major boon for pubs and restaurants, which will also be permitted to reopen from July 4. “All hospitality indoors will be limited to table service with minimal staff to customer contact,” he said.

Hotels, holiday apartments, caravan parks and campsites will be allowed to operate, as long as shared facilities are kept clean, as well as cinemas, arcades and theme parks, but swimming pools and spas “need to remain closed for now.”

The news comes as a huge relief for the UK hospitality industry, and for many campsite and holiday park owners, who feared that strict rules surrounding the use of shared facilities such as toilets and

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L.A. falls far short of COVID-19 promise to house 15,000 homeless people in hotels

Wendy Brown enters her room at the Cadillac Hotel in Venice on June 1 as part of Project Roomkey. <span class="copyright">(Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times)</span>
Wendy Brown enters her room at the Cadillac Hotel in Venice on June 1 as part of Project Roomkey. (Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times)

An ambitious Los Angeles County plan to lease hotel and motel rooms for 15,000 medically vulnerable homeless people is falling far short of its goal and may never provide rooms for more than a third of the intended population.

Project Roomkey has given safe haven to thousands of those it has housed. But as it enters its fourth month, negotiators have secured only 3,601 rooms. That’s only a fourth of the number needed to house all those who are eligible.

As a result, homeless officials are now changing course, saying they will continue working to find permanent housing for all those eligible, whether they first move into hotel rooms or remain on the street.

The Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority is scheduled to submit a plan to

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Pandemic Prompts Indie Hotels to Buy Ads in Price-Comparison Searches

The coronavirus pandemic has made many hotel companies more eager for direct bookings. Price-comparison websites are a significant source of such bookings, and new tools are making it easier for smaller hoteliers to ramp up their ad purchases on these metasearch brands.

Until now, independent hotels and regional hotel groups haven’t spent on metasearch. Yet some technological and cost barriers are falling away for smaller players. Plus, the sector’s revenue crisis has driven some desperate hoteliers to try new things.

“Many small hotels are operating at low capacity,” said Richard Clarke, a senior analyst at Bernstein Research who covers European leisure and hotels. “If I’m a hotel manager, I know I’m not going to be refurbishing the property. So I can use my extra time to see how to use metasearch to cut my biggest cost line after labor, which is distribution — which is about 30 percent hotel profitability.”

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Hotels Prep To Reopen In Connecticut

CONNECTICUT — If your favorite Connecticut hotel seems a little less accommodating on your next overnight stay, blame the coronavirus, and the state regulations that are being enforced in its wake.

On June 17, hotels, motels and B&Bs will be joining gyms, indoor recreation and personal services such as tattoo parlors among the business sectors allowed to come back online in Connecticut. Gov. Ned Lamont shuttered them all as part of his “Stay Safe, Stay Home” lockdown begun in March, intended to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Or almost all. The Ethan Allen on Lake Avenue Extension in Danbury was able to keep its doors open catering to essential workers.

“We mostly did essential workers from Danbury Hospital such as doctors and nurses who lived further away, maybe more than an hour, and they were working 12-hour shifts,” said Kimberly Olson, director of sales and marketing at Ethan Allen.

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