Foreign

Foreign students weigh studying in person vs. losing visas

PHOENIX (AP) — International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America.

The students from countries as diverse as India, China and Brazil say they are scrambling to devise plans after federal immigration authorities notified colleges this week that international students must leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools operate entirely online this fall. Some say they are thinking about returning home or moving to nearby Canada.

“I’m generating research, I’m doing work in a great economy,” said Batuhan Mekiker, a Ph.D. student from Turkey studying computer science at Montana State University in Bozeman. He’s in the third year of a five-year program.

”If I go to Turkey, I would not have that,” he said. “I would like to

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ICE order leaves foreign students helpless

A new federal immigration directive that threatens the deportation of international college students who take all of their classes online this fall left Florida college administrators scrambling and students panicking about their futures.

The directive issued Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says all students with F-1 or M-1 student visas in the U.S. must go back to their home countries if their courses are entirely online in the fall, a measure many colleges and universities are adopting due to the spread of the coronavirus. Harvard University announced Monday that all of its teaching will be done remotely for the fall semester

The measure is expected to impact at least 1 million students nationwide and more than 10,000 students in the South Florida region, according to ICE officials, local university statistics and College Factual, a New York-based company that gathers college data from the Department of Education.

International students,

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International Students in the U.S. Could Face ‘Devastating Upheaval’ in Wake of ICE Guidance for Foreign Students to Leave if Schools Are Online-Only

On her birthday, Justine learned that her future as a student in the U.S., and the futures of hundreds of thousands of international students like her — may be in jeopardy. New federal guidance announced Monday that international students will be required to leave the U.S. if their schools switch to an all-online curriculum amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Students already residing in the U.S. have been thrust into panic and uncertainty. “We’ve uprooted our entire lives to be here,” Justine says. She asked for her full name to be withheld because of fears about her immigration status. “The fact that it’s not coordinated and it’s not consistent messaging is very distressing for us and for our families.”

The new U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) guidance, states that international students on F-1 and M-1 visas “may not take a full online course load and remain” in the U.S. — posing

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes while in U.S.

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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Foreign pupils must leave US if classes go online

International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities.

The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for universities to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some institutions, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely.

President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and colleges return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. Soon after the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall, adding that Democrats want to keep schools closed “for political reasons, not for health reasons.”

“They think it will help them in November. Wrong, the people get it!” Trump wrote.

Under the updated rules, international

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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Canada’s models show virus slowing but could surge, temporary foreign workers boosting Ontario cases

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 29

2:30 p.m.: Most of Ontario’s case count from temporary foreign workers

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Foreign holidays ‘to restart on July 4’

beach - Getty
beach – Getty

British holidaymakers could enjoy overseas breaks from July 4 under plans being drawn up by the government.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to announce on June 29 that agreements have been made for so-called air bridges with a “small number” of countries with low levels of coronavirus.

This would allow families to take foreign holidays without having to self-isolate on their return to the UK. 

People could only travel with members of their household or ‘support bubble’, however, unless rules on social distancing are eased before July. 

They would also have to abide by the rules on social distancing in their destination, meaning that countries with similar restrictions to the UK are likely to be first in the queue.

Ministers want to set up air bridges to countries that are “most advantageous” to the UK economy, which are likely to include popular destinations such as France,

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Is it safe to travel to Spain this summer? Latest Foreign Office advice and restrictions

Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock
Playa de Formentor, Mallorca, Spain: istock

As countries around the globe tentatively begin to relax restrictions on travel, the promise of tapas al fresco and long, lazy sun-filled days beside the sea come top of the travel wish-list for many tourists.

Spain has long topped the list as one of the UK’s favourite holiday destinations, with more than 18 million British tourists visiting in 2019 – a fifth of the country’s overall total of nearly 84 million visitors, according to figures from the National Institute of Statistics.

But can British holidaymakers get there? And will we be welcome if we do?

Here’s all the information you need to know.

Am I allowed to travel to Spain from the UK?

At the moment, the Foreign Office is advising against all non-essential international travel – including to Spain.

The ban was initially put in place to avoid Britons getting stuck abroad as

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