Florida

Florida has 47 hospitals with no ICU beds

The novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 570,000 people worldwide.

Over 12.9 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

The United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 3.3 million diagnosed cases and at least 135,379 deaths.

LA won’t begin school year with in-person classes Arizona’s ICUs 90% full Hong Kong Disneyland to temporarily close

Here is how the news is developing today. All times Eastern.

JetBlue is joining Delta and Southwest in extending its empty adjacent seat policy. 

“JetBlue has extended its guarantee of blocked middle seats … Read More

Florida, Arizona, Texas Opened ‘Too Aggressively,’ Public Health Expert Says

Since Chinese officials locked down the city of Wuhan in January, there have been more than 12.9 million cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, across the planet.

More than 569,000 people have died from the disease, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Efforts to curb the outbreak have led to the global disruption of daily life and the economy, as schools and workplaces shuttered in hopes of slowing transmission. After months of precautions and lockdowns, governments have begun to reopen their economies.

HuffPost reporters around the world are tracking the pandemic and its effects.

Read the latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic below. (To see the latest updates, you may need to refresh the page. All times are Eastern. For earlier updates on the pandemic, go here.)

Florida, Arizona, Texas ‘Opened Too Early’ And ‘Too Aggressively,’ Public Health Expert Says — 7/13/20, 8:52 a.m. ET

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Florida Breaks Record Daily Cases in U.S. Outbreak: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

Florida reported 15,300 new virus cases, the biggest one-day rise since the coronavirus pandemic began in the U.S. The number exceeds records from New York, California and Texas, all of which have reported daily counts at almost 12,000. Reported deaths in Florida dropped to 44, from 95 the day before.

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said “the rule should be that kids go back to school this fall,” despite rising cases around the country. Arizona reported a higher increase in fatalities, even as new cases declined.

South Africa may reintroduce tighter regulations on the movement of people and curb sales of alcohol as coronavirus infections soar, the Sunday Times reported. Hungary is also restricting travel after spikes in neighboring countries. Infections in Germany increased by 377. U.K. cases remained steady.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 12.7 million; deaths surpass 565,000Aversion to mask-wearing holds back U.S. economyU.K. set

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Florida Cases Hit Record; Push to Open Schools: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) —

Florida reported its highest-ever increase of Covid-19 cases, 15,300, or a 6% rise compared to a 4.8% average over the last week. Reported deaths dropped to 44, from 95 the day before.

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said “the rule should be that kids go back to school this fall,” despite rising cases around the country.

South Africa may reintroduce tighter regulations on the movement of people and curb sales of alcohol as coronavirus infections soar, the Sunday Times reported. Hungary is also restricting travel after spikes in neighboring countries. Infections in Germany increased by 377.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 12.7 million; deaths surpass 565,000Aversion to mask-wearing holds back U.S. economyU.K. set to tighten rules on wearing face masksWall Street forges a new relationship to data in coronavirus ageConflicting visions emerge for South Africa’s post-virus revivalAnonymity helped overcome stigma in Korean nightclub probe

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A first look inside Disney World Florida after four-month hiatus

Disney Land, Florida
Disney Land, Florida

Walt Disney World’s vital influence on Florida’s extensive tourism industry will be put to the test this weekend as the huge Orlando resort re-opens its theme parks for the first time since mid-March.

Amid a raft of new procedures, adaptations and health and safety regulations, the House of Mouse is being seen as the potential saviour of the Sunshine State’s virus-hit economy that has suffered a massive downturn since the advent of Covid-19.

Orlando remains in a state of deep tourist depression and in urgent need of an economic turbo boost, despite other parks and attractions like Universal Orlando and SeaWorld reopening more than a month ago. Only this week, one of the leading local hotel chains – the Rosen Hotels group – announced its first round of redundancies due to continued lack of demand.

The company’s president and chief operating officer Harris Rosen amitted that “since

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A first look inside Disneyland Florida after four-month hiatus

Disney Land, Florida
Disney Land, Florida

Walt Disney World’s vital influence on Florida’s extensive tourism industry will be put to the test this weekend as the huge Orlando resort re-opens its theme parks for the first time since mid-March.

Amid a raft of new procedures, adaptations and health and safety regulations, the House of Mouse is being seen as the potential saviour of the Sunshine State’s virus-hit economy that has suffered a massive downturn since the advent of Covid-19.

Orlando remains in a state of deep tourist depression and in urgent need of an economic turbo boost, despite other parks and attractions like Universal Orlando and SeaWorld reopening more than a month ago. Only this week, one of the leading local hotel chains – the Rosen Hotels group – announced its first round of redundancies due to continued lack of demand.

The company’s president and chief operating officer Harris Rosen amitted that “since

Read More

Can you visit Florida beaches for the 4th of July? It depends on how far you want to travel

South Florida’s Fourth of July holiday festivities this year will include masks, social distancing and virtual fireworks because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But not beaches.

If you’re looking to celebrate the Fourth sunbathing on the sand with a piña colada in your hand, you’ll have to take a road trip up north. South Florida beaches are closing for the holiday weekend because of the recent rise in COVID-19 cases.

Late-night celebrations will also be limited.

In Miami-Dade, restaurants with more than an eight-person capacity and other food establishments, including fast-food chains and diners, are not allowed to offer in-person dining from 12:01 a.m. to 6 a.m. daily until further notice. If you get a late night craving, pick-up and delivery will still be available.

Miami Beach is also reimposing a citywide curfew from 12:30 a.m. to 5 a.m. until further notice, with restaurants having to close for in-person dining and

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Florida Cases Rise Most Ever; Djokovic Is Negative: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — Florida’s cases and hospitalizations jumped by the most ever, while deaths rose the most in a month. The cornoavirus may be mutating in a way that may make it easier to spread, said Anthony Fauci, the top U.S. infectious disease researcher.

Houston reported a 4.3% jump in intensive-care patients, and may need to tap extra beds in less than two weeks. The South Africa province that includes Johannesburg and Pretoria may impose local lockdowns and alcohol curbs as cases surge.

New York City plans to reopen its public schools in September. The U.S. labor market rebound accelerated in June as broader reopenings spurred hiring, though recent virus pickups put the gains in jeopardy.

Global Tracker: Cases pass 10.7 million; Deaths top 517,000Life, liberty and face masks: a virus preys on AmericaRights of American workers could change after virusAn unfestive July 4th as states call off the celebrationsDining out … Read More

Los Angeles, Florida counties to close beaches for July 4th weekend; WHO warns ‘worst is yet to come’; 126K US deaths

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come” and European Union leaders were ready to extend the ban on American travelers for at least two more weeks.

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. Jacksonville, Florida, which is scheduled to host the GOP convention, is mandating masks, though it’s not clear for how long. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020. And beaches in Los Angeles and several Florida counties will be closed for Fourth of July weekend as cases surge.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has shortened recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are

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No turning back for Florida, Texas? Why the next two weeks are ‘critical’ for US, Fauci warns

States have arrived at a crossroads that will define the coronavirus pandemic in the United States as half of the country struggles to manage rising COVID-19 cases, health experts say.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious disease expert at the National Institutes of Health, told Congress on Tuesday that the next two weeks will be “critical” in how the country addresses the surge in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona. 

Experts say states that don’t manage their case counts risk overwhelming the health care system again and infecting neighboring states that have already flattened the curve. While summer travel is expected to decline 15% from last year, AAA still projects 683 million road trips from July to September, which could spread coronavirus.

All this could happen ahead of the fall, when the coronavirus may reappear in a second wave and likely be accompanied by the flu.

‘Grave concerns’: COVID-19’s surge

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