Fall

Thanks to coronavirus, Americans looking at a stay-at-home fall season, survey suggests

Most Americans have likely accepted that the coronavirus pandemic will make this fall much different from past years, with most expecting their home to be a place of work and learning when the school year starts.

More than 6 out of 10 Americans (61%) said it is likely they will be working from home this fall and 56% said it was unlikely they would be working from their office, according to The Harris Poll survey of 1,970 U.S. adults from July 18-19.

Home won’t only be the place where work is done, it will likely be a hub of learning, too. Two-thirds (66%) of Americans said they do not expect their kids will be in school this fall and instead will take courses online from home.

Vitamin C by IV and an FBI raid: How hope, rather than proof, sent the antioxidant’s sales soaring during COVID-19.

‘Holiday shopping will be

Read More

New York City says child care will be available for 100K children in the fall as schools partially reopen

New York City plans to provide child care for 100,000 children once its schools partially reopen in the fall with the goal of expanding that capacity even further during the school year, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Thursday.

New York’s schools have preliminary plans for a “blended learning” approach for its 1.1 million students, relying on a combination of in-person and remote learning beginning in September. With the current hybrid plan, most students would be inside their physical schools just two or three days a week as the coronavirus pandemic continues.

The new child care capacity will be available to parents on the days that a child’s school is remote and “regardless of ability to pay,” de Blasio and other city officials said Thursday when announcing the plan.

“We’ve got to give more ability to parents who need to get back to work …child care will make all the difference

Read More

Will UConn play football this year? Public health experts unsure about fall sports during coronavirus pandemic

Currently, UConn football players are on campus in Storrs. They have been tested for COVID-19. They have passed through a modified quarantine period during which they remained in small groups. They have completed strength and conditioning workouts. They have begun on-field activities.

But no one knows for sure whether they’ll actually get to play.

Amid a raging pandemic, public health experts both nationally and in Connecticut have raised eyebrows about the idea of college sports this fall. Some say the games will be safe as long as schools implement proper protocols. Others wonder whether sports, particularly on college campuses, are worth the risk.

“We’re in the middle of a pandemic, and there is no way we can make the risk zero,” said Dr. Matthew Cartter, Connecticut’s state epidemiologist. “We have to ask ourselves as a society, are sports important that we’re willing to accept the risk that people involved in

Read More

U.S. Government Backs Down On In-Person Requirement This Fall

Harvard University sued the federal government to block sa proposed rule change that would have required foreign students to take some in-person classes this fall. File photo

Coronavirus cases are climbing across the country. Multiple states have sued. Universities, from the big names to the small, have voiced their opposition, and in some cases gone to court.

Now the government of Donald Trump is backing down from a rule change that would have required international students in the United States to take some in-person classes or risk having their visas revoked. The rule also would have barred foreign students from entry to the country if they planned to attend programs that will be entirely online this fall.

One day after 17 states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in U.S. district court in Boston, Massachusetts, seeking to block the rule change — and less than a week after

Read More

Harvard’s international students are begging the school to let them come to campus in the fall, citing fears of being stuck in unstable home environments if they’re forced to leave the US

One student is circulating a "Hear Us Harvard" petition asking the university to better support international students.
One student is circulating a “Hear Us Harvard” petition asking the university to better support international students.

Charles Krupa/AP

  • Last week, ICE released guidance stating that international students would not be allowed back into the US in the fall unless they were taking in-person classes at their university.

  • This poses a problem for Harvard’s international students, as the school recently said classes in the fall would be entirely remote.

  • Students told Business Insider that these regulations pose serious problems for them, including the difficulty of keeping up with online courses while in a different time zone and with poor internet connection.

  • Some also face unsafe or unaccommodating home situations, making it even harder for them to find a proper place to keep up with their studies.

  • Rachael Dane, a spokesperson for Harvard, told Business Insider that “the overwhelming reason to deliver all instruction remotely is Harvard’s commitment to protecting the

Read More

Fall semester starts next month at UC Merced. What will happen to classes amid COVID-19?

UC Merced plans to open campus for the fall semester on Aug. 26 with a hybrid mode — with some classes being offered on-campus and while others will be online.

How do to that safely, however, remains a work in progress, as coronavirus case numbers surge statewide and the central San Joaquin Valley.

Campus administrators say there will be safety guidelines in place for students, faculty and staff which include health screenings, face masks and social distancing guidelines.

The amount of students actually returning to campus in August will likely be a small percentage of the 8,847 undergraduate and graduate students who were on campus in the fall of 2019 as UC Merced officials attempt to limit the number of people physically at the school..

In a letter sent to the campus community recently, UC Merced Chief Resilience Officer Andrew Boyd explained “the goal is to minimize person-to-person contact on

Read More

How University of California campuses are opening this fall

University of California campuses will offer mostly online instruction this fall, but each school has the power to set its own rules and at least two of them are already revising early plans to account for new coronavirus outbreaks.

Some schools plan to offer 30% of instruction in person, while others intend to limit on-site coursework to laboratory and studio classes. Some are prioritizing incoming freshmen for campus housing while others plan to reserve rooms for students with special circumstances, including financial need.

As the pandemic’s trajectory continues to change, university administrators warn campuses may revert to reduced operations even after the fall semester begins.

At least two schools — UC Berkeley and UC Merced — are already reevaluating their plans in light of recent COVID-19 developments. At Cal, that’s because frat parties triggered an outbreak that more than doubled the total number of infections tied to Berkeley’s campus, officials

Read More

ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes while in U.S.

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

Read More

ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

Read More

Harvard is keeping classes online this fall, placing it among the 8% of US colleges planning to do so. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

  • Harvard University announced Monday that it will only conduct classes online for the coming academic year, though it will allow some students to live on campus.

  • Other universities and colleges across the US — including the country’s largest four-year public university system, California State University— are opting for online-only courses in the fall 2020 semester.

  • The coronavirus could resurge in the fall, bringing a new wave of infections.

  • Here are the schools that aren’t planning to return to campus this fall.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

Harvard announced

Read More