destinations

Where can Americans travel now amid bans in many destinations?

People traveling from the U.S. are banned in popular destinations around the world due to large spikes in coronavirus cases in several states.

Americans looking for a summer vacation destination have a dilemma on their hands as they ask, “Where am I allowed to travel right now?”

The Department of State issued a warning in March to all U.S. citizens against international travel, saying “your travel plans may be severely disrupted, and you may be forced to remain outside of the United States for an indefinite time frame.” The CDC also warns against nonessential travel.

Besides warnings within the country, people traveling from the U.S. are banned in popular destinations around the world due to large spikes in coronavirus cases in several states.

The European Union is turning away American visitors, and Mexico and Canada have closed their land borders, but there are still some options available for those who

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Can Tourist Destinations Survive the Coronavirus?

Click here to read the full article.

Tourism has virtually stopped thanks to the COVID-19 lockdowns. This is hitting many cities hard – see this report about New York galleries and museums losing millions of dollars, for example. Many tourist businesses are now contemplating a future without lucrative international visitors, having to rely instead on those closer to home.

In Scotland, where I am based, the chief executive of the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions believes that 80% of the country’s attractions may not survive the next 12 months. He thinks many will not be viable if you combine a massive drop in international numbers with the current rules about two-metre social distancing and other health and safety requirements.

Obviously, such damage would spread far beyond the tourist attractions. It threatens thousands of jobs and business closures in everything from hotels to ice cream vans, particularly since the pandemic has

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How tourist destinations can rebuild after coronavirus

<span class="caption">The end of the road?</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://unsplash.com/photos/wFWQmOyfkkM" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Joshua Earle">Joshua Earle</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY-SA">CC BY-SA</a></span>
The end of the road? Joshua Earle, CC BY-SA

Tourism has virtually stopped thanks to the COVID-19 lockdowns. This is hitting many cities hard – see this report about New York galleries and museums losing millions of dollars, for example. Many tourist businesses are now contemplating a future without lucrative international visitors, having to rely instead on those closer to home.

In Scotland, where I am based, the chief executive of the Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions believes that 80% of the country’s attractions may not survive the next 12 months. He thinks many will not be viable if you combine a massive drop in international numbers with the current rules about two-metre social distancing and other health and safety requirements.

Obviously, such damage would spread far beyond the tourist attractions. It threatens thousands of jobs and business closures in everything from hotels to ice cream vans, particularly since the

Read More