Coronavirus

Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders

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Tiny desert town devastated by wildfire as it battles the coronavirus

Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. <span class="copyright">(Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. (Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)

For Genesis Palta, the pandemic had already meant a chain-reaction of adjustments.

The stay-at-home orders forced her mother to stop selling Mexican desserts to her neighbors, which cut into the family’s meager income. Her father worried about catching the coronavirus and passing it on to his family. But they depended on the $500 in cash he got paid each week, so he toiled 13-hour shifts in the vast broccoli and cauliflower fields.

To help make ends meet, Palta, 20, used part of her financial aid money for Imperial Valley College to buy toilet paper and masks online when supplies ran short in local markets. “We even started limiting the number of times we used the bathroom to save on toilet paper,” she said. “I’d constantly think:

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Coronavirus puppy scams ‘seemed legit,’ ensnared dog lovers amid pandemic: Illegal Tender podcast

Everyone has had a different quarantine experience, and many people coping through the pandemic saw a golden opportunity to bring home a new puppy. 

But for the unsuspecting and unlucky, the quest for a dog ensnared them in a scam. Many only found out after a deal had been brokered with an alleged breeder and they had paid for a dog that wasn’t real. 

Season six of Illegal Tender explores the underground world of online puppy scams through conversations with two victims of such scams and one industry watchdog who points out the potential red flags associated with buying a dog online, sight unseen. 

Episode two is a conversation with Elanore, who is a twenty-something student in the U.K. studying biomedical research. 

Her search for a chocolate Labrador retriever started in June. Elanore’s a dog lover, but it’s been over two decades since her family has owned a dog. Her … Read More

Can you still get cover in the age of coronavirus?

Getty/iStock
Getty/iStock

As holidays and business travel abroad resume, many people are concerned about the risks posed by coronavirus – and the problems they may face getting adequate insurance.

These are the key questions and answers.

I booked my August holiday to Greece last January and took out insurance at the time. Will it still cover me for coronavirus?

It depends on the precise details of your cover. Some policies may have a general exclusion for claims triggered by pandemics. But otherwise you can expect to be covered for claims related to coronavirus.

There are two main areas of claims.

The first is for recompense of funds lost because of cancellations. A typical example: suppose Greece were to continue its ban on UK flights beyond 15 July (which, by the way, I don’t expect). If you have booked a DIY holiday, you would automatically be entitled to a full refund from

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Just 8% of colleges are keeping classes online this fall, but more may join them as coronavirus outbreaks surge. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

California State University, the largest four-year public university system in the US, has cancelled in-person classes for the fall semester at all 23 of its campuses. Instead, classes will take place almost exclusively online, Chancellor Timothy White announced in May.

“Our university, when open without restrictions and fully in person… is a place where over 500,000 people come together in close and vibrant proximity,” White said at the meeting, according to the Los Angeles Times. “That approach sadly just isn’t in the cards now.”

Six of Harvard’s graduate and professional

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Joe Biden blasts Trump, offers alternatives to coronavirus response

WILMINGTON, Del. – Joe Biden blasted President Donald Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic Tuesday and announced a plan to control the virus that he said Trump should adopt immediately. 

During a speech at Alexis I. duPont High School in Wilmington, Biden outlined the plan, which includes increased testing and rigorous contact tracing. It follows a road map that Biden released in March which he said would have saved lives had it been adopted.

Biden is also proposing to get more protective supplies to health care workers and provide a more consistent message on the importance of wearing a mask in public.

The former vice president stressed that the virus is still here and the threat to American public health remains.

“COVID-19 will likely worsen,” Biden said. “We need real plans, real guidelines with uniform, nationwide standards to help us chart our economic reopening.”

Joe Biden addresses the media on the coronavirus (COVID-19) at the Hotel DuPont, in Wilmington, De., on Thursday afternoon.
Joe Biden addresses the media on
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Inside One Mother’s Fight To Help Her Kids Get An Education During Coronavirus

(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)
(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)

This story about rural education was produced as part of the series Critical Condition: The Students the Pandemic Hit Hardest, reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience. She had been sitting in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Greenville, Mississippi, for more than an hour, so her oldest child, Kentiona, could connect to the building’s Wi-Fi, something they didn’t have at home. Johnson didn’t want her daughter to feel rushed. 

Kentiona, 16, was in the passenger seat using the car’s dashboard as a makeshift desk. Her high school had recently closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and shifted to distance learning. Kentiona’s persuasive essay for her English class had brought them to the McDonald’s on that third Friday

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Herndon Native Helps Fight Food Insecurity During Coronavirus

HERNDON, VA — Like many people, Leah Fri’s life has been disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. But, she hasn’t let that stop her from doing something positive with her time.

When Fri found herself back home and out of a summer internship, she began volunteering for FarmLink, a grassroots effort to prevent food waste and alleviate food insecurity during the pandemic.

“This was such a good opportunity,” Fri said. “Not only will I be doing good for the community but the entire country.”

Back in March, the rising senior at James Madison University was traveling with friends, when she first found out they’d be studying online after spring break due to the coronavirus. Eventually, the entire spring semester was conducted remotely.

“It’s all pretty crazy,” the Herndon native said. “Obviously, none of us have really experienced something like this. It was nice to be home and all, but definitely unfortunate

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Coronavirus positive: Good news round up

Undated handout photo issued by St Moritz Hotel & Spa of individual striped beach huts near Rock, Cornwall, where the hotel has been building a purpose-built socially distanced restaurant believed to be the first of its kind. - St Moritz Hotel & Spa
Undated handout photo issued by St Moritz Hotel & Spa of individual striped beach huts near Rock, Cornwall, where the hotel has been building a purpose-built socially distanced restaurant believed to be the first of its kind. – St Moritz Hotel & Spa

News of socially distanced dining to end the week, with what is thought to be the UK’s first purpose-built socially distant restaurant.

St Moritz Hotel & Spa, near Rock in Cornwall, will be able to welcome guests in self-contained accommodation from July 4 – and there will be a restaurant perfect for these unprecedented times for patrons to enjoy as well.

The eatery will see guests seated in private dining rooms, and what it might lack in the hustle and bustle of a busy restaurant from pre-Covid times, it will more than make up for in a sense of luxury and ocassion.

Business in Cornwall has been

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Coronavirus Protection Strategies for Seniors

As the COVID-19 pandemic—caused by the novel coronavirus—has spread, expert guidance on the viral illness has evolved time and again as we learn more about it.

But one message has been clear throughout: Older adults are at increased risk for severe disease, and the older you are the more elevated your risk. Those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, and people 85 and older are at the greatest risk, according to new information from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Health experts knew early on in the outbreak that age was a significant factor: A study published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association in February looked at almost 45,000 people in China diagnosed with COVID-19. It found that almost 15 percent of those 80 and older, and 8 percent of those in their 70s, died after contracting

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