Classes

Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Fall semester starts next month at UC Merced. What will happen to classes amid COVID-19?

UC Merced plans to open campus for the fall semester on Aug. 26 with a hybrid mode — with some classes being offered on-campus and while others will be online.

How do to that safely, however, remains a work in progress, as coronavirus case numbers surge statewide and the central San Joaquin Valley.

Campus administrators say there will be safety guidelines in place for students, faculty and staff which include health screenings, face masks and social distancing guidelines.

The amount of students actually returning to campus in August will likely be a small percentage of the 8,847 undergraduate and graduate students who were on campus in the fall of 2019 as UC Merced officials attempt to limit the number of people physically at the school..

In a letter sent to the campus community recently, UC Merced Chief Resilience Officer Andrew Boyd explained “the goal is to minimize person-to-person contact on

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ICE says students taking ‘hybrid’ classes may be able to stay in the US, but it won’t tell colleges what that means

Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.
Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.

Facebook/NYU

  • New guidelines from ICE prevent international students on certain visas from attending schools that are fully online, but may allow them to remain if they’re taking a mixture of online and in-person classes.

  • Many universities have announced they will use a “hybrid model,” combining both in-person and online courses for the upcoming academic year.

  • With “very little information” included in the announcement, however, the new policy lacks clarity in what may be required for a hybrid model, a Senior Legislative and Advocacy Counsel at ACLU told Business Insider.

  • A number of faculty have spoken out on social media that they will offer “1-unit in-person study with any student that faces removal from the country” due to the new policy. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Universities have

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes while in U.S.

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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Foreign pupils must leave US if classes go online

International students will be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer to another college if their schools offer classes entirely online this fall, under new guidelines issued Monday by federal immigration authorities.

The guidelines, issued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, provide additional pressure for universities to reopen even amid growing concerns about the recent spread of COVID-19 among young adults. Colleges received the guidance the same day that some institutions, including Harvard University, announced that all instruction will be offered remotely.

President Donald Trump has insisted that schools and colleges return to in-person instruction as soon as possible. Soon after the guidance was released, Trump repeated on Twitter that schools must reopen this fall, adding that Democrats want to keep schools closed “for political reasons, not for health reasons.”

“They think it will help them in November. Wrong, the people get it!” Trump wrote.

Under the updated rules, international

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ICE says international students could be deported if their classes go online

As the coronavirus pandemic forces colleges nationwide to assess the risks of bringing students back to campus in the fall, the fate of thousands of international students could be hanging in the balance.

On Monday, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that international students pursuing degrees in the U.S. will have to leave the country under the threat of deportation if their university switches to online-only classes. ICE’s release says that the State Department will not issue visas to any student taking a fully online course load, and if in-person classes are not an option at a certain university, it recommends that students who wish to remain in the country transfer to a school that offers them.

Though visa requirements have always been strict, and online-only courseloads have always been prohibited for international students coming to the U.S., ICE’s move to more-or-less ignore the extraordinary circumstances of the pandemic still

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ICE says foreign students can’t take online-only fall classes

The Trump administration on Monday unveiled new fall semester rules for foreign students, including a requirement that they take in-person classes to remain in the U.S., a condition that raised concerns as certain colleges and universities are planning to use online instruction because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Under the new guidelines by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which oversees the U.S. Student and Exchange Visitor Program, foreigners with F-1 or M-1 visas — which are for academic and vocational international students, respectively — will not be allowed to participate in an entirely online fall semester.

The State Department will not issue those visas to students planning to attend schools that will only offer remote learning and Customs and Border Protection officials will not allow such applicants to enter the country, according to a summary of the temporary rule, which ICE said will be published in the federal government’s journal of

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Harvard is keeping classes online this fall, placing it among the 8% of US colleges planning to do so. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

  • Harvard University announced Monday that it will only conduct classes online for the coming academic year, though it will allow some students to live on campus.

  • Other universities and colleges across the US — including the country’s largest four-year public university system, California State University— are opting for online-only courses in the fall 2020 semester.

  • The coronavirus could resurge in the fall, bringing a new wave of infections.

  • Here are the schools that aren’t planning to return to campus this fall.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

Harvard announced

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Students on visas must take in-person college classes or risk deportation, ICE says

Immigration and Customs Enforcement issued a new guidance on how student visa status will depend on if U.S. universities are providing online or in-person classes this fall.

ICE’s Student and Exchange Visitor Program won’t let students into the U.S. if they are going to schools that offer online classes only, according to a news release.

Instead, foreign students must take in-person classes if they wish to remain in the U.S. — otherwise, they must take the online classes out of the country or risk deportation if they stay.

“The U.S. Department of State will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States,” the release said. “Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such

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Just 8% of colleges are keeping classes online this fall, but more may join them as coronavirus outbreaks surge. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

California State University, the largest four-year public university system in the US, has cancelled in-person classes for the fall semester at all 23 of its campuses. Instead, classes will take place almost exclusively online, Chancellor Timothy White announced in May.

“Our university, when open without restrictions and fully in person… is a place where over 500,000 people come together in close and vibrant proximity,” White said at the meeting, according to the Los Angeles Times. “That approach sadly just isn’t in the cards now.”

Six of Harvard’s graduate and professional

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