Black

Hampton Inn worker fired for calling cops on Black guests; Police open ‘internal investigation’

A Hampton Inn employee has been fired after calling the police on a Black family using the hotel’s swimming pool in Williamston, North Carolina.

“Hampton by Hilton has zero tolerance for racism or discrimination of any kind. On Saturday, we were alerted to an online video of a guest incident at one of our franchise properties,” Shruti Gandhi Buckley, the Global Head of Hampton by Hilton, said in a statement to USA TODAY Monday. “The team member is no longer employed at the hotel.”

In a nearly 10-minute Facebook Live video shared across social media, a white hotel employee and two Williamston police officers approach a Black woman who is using the pool with her children. They ask the woman, identified on her social media account as Anita Williams-Wright, to prove that she’s staying at the hotel. 

“I can’t believe this happened to me and my kids,” Williams-Wright captioned the

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Hampton Inn employee fired for calling cops on Black guests at the pool; Hilton apologizes

A Hampton Inn employee has been fired after calling the police on a Black family using the hotel’s swimming pool in Williamston, North Carolina.

“Hampton by Hilton has zero tolerance for racism or discrimination of any kind. On Saturday, we were alerted to an online video of a guest incident at one of our franchise properties,” Shruti Gandhi Buckley, the Global Head of Hampton by Hilton, said in a statement to USA TODAY Monday. “The team member is no longer employed at the hotel.”

In a nearly 10-minute Facebook Live video shared across social media, a white hotel employee and two Williamston police officers approach a Black woman who is using the pool with her children. They ask the woman, identified on her social media account as Anita Williams-Wright, to prove that she’s staying at the hotel.

“I can’t believe this happened to me and my kids,” Williams-Wright captioned the

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Here’s What You Can Do to Demand Justice for Black Lives and Support Protestors Right Now

Photo credit: raydene hansen - Hearst Owned
Photo credit: raydene hansen – Hearst Owned

From Cosmopolitan

The recent deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and Tony McDade, news surrounding the October 2019 killing of Brianna Hill, and the horrifying way a white woman used her privilege to threaten Christian Cooper’s life in Central Park have sparked international protests against racism and police brutality in America.

Over the past week, protestors in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Columbus, Anchorage, Atlanta, Salt Lake City, and New York City were confronted by police in riot gear, tear gas, and, in the case of Louisville, Kentucky, gunshots. (While it’s unclear who fired a gun, according to the New York Times, seven demonstrators in Kentucky were shot by the police.) This was in stark contrast to how the protestors who decried the stay-at-home orders were treated.

If you feel helpless, confused, angry, or fired up, there are actions you can take

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How Robert F. Smith, the Wealthiest Black American, Is Making Change

Photo credit: The Washington Post - Getty Images
Photo credit: The Washington Post – Getty Images

From Town & Country

The software titan Robert F. Smith and his wife Hope were supposed to be in Malibu in late March. They own two properties there, an $18 million beach house and a $19 million blufftop mansion, more than enough room for their family, which just expanded by two: Identical twin girls Zuri and Zya were born, by surrogate, in December, joining brothers Legend, 4, and Hendrix, 5.

Instead the Smiths, their children, Robert’s and Hope’s mothers, and multiple staffers have decamped to the family’s ranch in the mountains outside Denver to ride out the pandemic. Hope isn’t sleeping much, partly because the baby nurse got altitude sickness and bolted. And Robert is spending marathon days in his study coordinating a philanthropic response to the health crisis.

With a self-made fortune of roughly $5 billion, Smith is the United States’

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Learn About Riah Milton and Dominique Fells, the Black Transgender Women Murdered This Week

As Black Lives Matter protests continued across the U.S. and the world this week, two Black transgender women were killed within a 24-hour period. Riah Milton of Liberty Township, Ohio was shot several times during a robbery attempt on Tuesday, and Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells’s remains were found alongside the Schuylkill River in the Bartam’s Garden area of Philadelphia Monday night.

“It is with deep sadness that we share the news of the recent passing of a member of our LGBTQ family,” the Philadelphia’s Office of LGBT Affairs said in a statement following the identification of Fells, per Out magazine. “The pain of such a loss is always difficult, but it is especially deep as we are in the midst of Pride month—a season typically filled with joy and celebration for many in our community.”

Police initially misgendered both Fells, 27, and Milton, 25, in their initial reports of the deaths.

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Here’s How to Support the Black LGBTQ+ Community

As Black Lives Matter protests merge with Pride marches, global citizens are proving the fight for equality is inextricably intersectional—and urgent. The continued violence against Black LGBTQ+ people, specifically Black transgender women, has us approaching Pride Month with a louder call for justice. On Friday, the fourth anniversary of the Pulse nightclub shooting, the Trump administration finalized a rule to roll back protections for transgender people; the rule would make it easier for doctors and hospitals to deny health care to transgender patients.

Supporting the Black LGBTQ+ community starts with education. The 51st anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising reminds us that there wouldn’t be a Pride Month without Black trans women like Marsha P. Johnson and Stormé DeLarverie, who have just begun to gain widespread recognition for their pivotal roles in the battle of liberation—and today’s civil rights movement wouldn’t be possible without Patrisse Cullors and Alicia Garza, queer Black

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