American

American Airlines attendant gives Black Lives Matter note to travel influencer

This flight attendant made sure that one of his passengers felt truly supported.

On Tuesday, travel influencer Kellee Edwards was flying in first class when she received a “meaningful” note from her American Airlines flight attendant.

Edwards, who hosts the Travel Channel’s television series “Mysterious Islands,” posted a picture of the note on social media.

FIGHT ON CANADIAN PLANE OVER CHILD REFUSING TO WEAR MASK CANCELS FLIGHT

The message was written as a postscript on a generic card for first class passengers on American Airlines flights. The note, written by flight attendant John McCullough said: “I see you. You matter. Black lives matter.”

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On Twitter, Edwards said the note made a big difference to her.

“Now THIS is customer service,” she tweeted. “Such a simple gesture, but BEYOND meaningful. To simply be seen, in today’s climate and world. I may or

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Biden snags support from prominent Muslim American officials

Several prominent Muslim American elected officials endorsed Joe Biden for president in a letter organized by Emgage Action ahead of an online summit that starts Monday and features the presumptive Democratic nominee.

Among those signing the letter, obtained by The Associated Press, are Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar, Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison and Indiana Rep. Andre Carson, all Democrats. Omar, one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, served as a high-profile surrogate for Bernie Sanders before he exited the presidential race in April — making her support for Biden potentially helpful as the former vice president seeks to mobilize Muslim voters this fall.

The letter coincides with an online summit that Emgage Action has titled “Million Muslim Votes,” underscoring its emphasis on boosting Muslim turnout in November. Biden is set to address the gathering on Monday.

“Joe Biden’s presence serves not only to galvanize Muslim Americans to cast

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The slow death of the American all-you-can-eat buffet

The Shady Maples Smorgasbord - specialising in Amish food - is requiring a mask and gloves
The Shady Maples Smorgasbord – specialising in Amish food – is requiring a mask and gloves

A dining experience beloved by generations of hungry Americans is in danger of being spoiled by the coronavirus pandemic.

Buffets – from the humblest hotel breakfasts to the grandest casino banquets – are struggling to stay afloat as new health restrictions come into place and wary diners eschew the self-serve dining tradition.

As many buffets go out of business across the US, others are innovating and trying desperately to keep the business model relevant and appetising.

What is the problem?

Susan Yin, the owner of Jack’s Fresh in downtown Washington DC, tells BBC News that her average sales have dropped nearly 90% after they re-opened two months ago following a two month closure.

Jack’s Fresh, which specialises in Asian food and American sandwiches, is currently making around $500 (£398) per day, down from an

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How American Gaylen Grandstaff finally got out of Russia after years falsely jailed

Standing at border control in Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport in early April, Gaylen Grandstaff wasn’t sure what was about to happen.

A 53-year-old American from Texas, Grandstaff had been trapped in Russia for almost three years, stuck in a nightmare because of a cleaning product.

Falsely charged by Russian prosecutors with large-scale drug smuggling for ordering a bottle of solvent cleaner online , he had spent nearly two of those years in a Moscow jail while on trial, an ordeal that ABC News chronicled in a documentary film last year.

A court released him and twice found the charges against him to be unfounded. But police had refused to let go of the case.

So as he’d walked towards passport control, Grandstaff thought at best he might likely be turned back—at worst he was taking steps back towards prison.

That didn’t happen. Instead, Grandstaff is finally back in the United States—out

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WHO issues ‘worst is yet to come’ warning; European Union to extend American travel ban

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come” and European Union leaders were ready to extend the ban on American travelers for at least two more weeks.

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. Jacksonville, Florida, which is scheduled to host the GOP convention, is mandating masks, though it’s not clear for how long. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are the most significant developments of the day:

  • Worldwide coronavirus cases surpassed 10 million, while more than 504,000 across

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These 12 Countries are Welcoming American Travelers Now (or Will Be Soon)

Note: International travel restrictions and guidelines are changing regularly. The information below is accurate as of the time of publication (Friday, June 26). You should not travel if you are unwell.

After months of staying at home in order to help stop the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), some Americans are dreaming of a summer vacation.

Many countries are not currently welcoming international visitors in order to keep their citizens safe and healthy. And others, like the 27 nations that make up the European Union, will likely not allow Americans upon reopening on July 1 due to the U.S.’s inability to contain its coronavirus outbreak. The nation set a new record for daily infections on July 24 with well over 36,000 new reported cases, surpassing the previous high from April.

With the E.U. out of the question for the time being, we put together a list of 12 countries where

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How Robert F. Smith, the Wealthiest Black American, Is Making Change

Photo credit: The Washington Post - Getty Images
Photo credit: The Washington Post – Getty Images

From Town & Country

The software titan Robert F. Smith and his wife Hope were supposed to be in Malibu in late March. They own two properties there, an $18 million beach house and a $19 million blufftop mansion, more than enough room for their family, which just expanded by two: Identical twin girls Zuri and Zya were born, by surrogate, in December, joining brothers Legend, 4, and Hendrix, 5.

Instead the Smiths, their children, Robert’s and Hope’s mothers, and multiple staffers have decamped to the family’s ranch in the mountains outside Denver to ride out the pandemic. Hope isn’t sleeping much, partly because the baby nurse got altitude sickness and bolted. And Robert is spending marathon days in his study coordinating a philanthropic response to the health crisis.

With a self-made fortune of roughly $5 billion, Smith is the United States’

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Summer visitors to American parks choose safety first over freedom to roam

<span class="caption">Utah's Bryce Canyon National Park hosted more than 2.5 million visitors in 2019.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://unsplash.com/photos/gFtJO8ciK90" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Anqi Lu/Unsplash">Anqi Lu/Unsplash</a>, <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:CC BY">CC BY</a></span>
Utah’s Bryce Canyon National Park hosted more than 2.5 million visitors in 2019. Anqi Lu/Unsplash, CC BY

In a typical summer, millions of Americans head outdoors to national parks, hiking trails and rivers across the U.S. This summer, because of COVID-19 precautions, getting outdoors will be different, although how different isn’t certain.

My colleagues and I are part of a research team at Pennsylvania State University that studies outdoor recreation and park management. Our team recently conducted a national survey of more 1,000 outdoor enthusiasts across 47 states with the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.

The survey asked several key questions that included how those who use parks were considering a return to outdoor recreation this summer and how parks might be managed for COVID-19 to ensure the safety and security of park users.

The responses to the survey suggested that this summer, we may be entering a

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Public health experts ranked 36 American activities based on risk

As more and more states begin phases of reopening, many Americans are now wondering what is safe to do and what should still be avoided to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

“There’s a huge amount of variation from business to business, from area to area, in how much transmission risk there is for resuming economic activity,” Dr. Katherine Baicker, of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, told Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker.

An analysis by MLive chose 36 American activities and asked four public health experts to weigh in on the risk of coronavirus exposure for each activity. The experts factored in whether the activity is inside or outside, proximity to others, how long you’d be exposed, the likelihood of compliance, and your personal risk level. 

Bars and large music concerts are the riskiest settings right now. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

With 1 being the least risky

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