Airlines

Singapore Airlines to cut 4,300 jobs amid coronavirus travel downturn

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Airlines Seek Gate Checks for Virus to Revive Foreign Travel

(Bloomberg) — A coalition of international airline and aviation groups is calling on U.S. government leaders to help set Covid-19 testing protocols to assuage passenger concerns and boost severely depressed international travel.



a group of people standing in a room: A worker speaks with travelers at San Francisco International Airport on Aug. 31.


© Bloomberg
A worker speaks with travelers at San Francisco International Airport on Aug. 31.

In a letter to three cabinet secretaries signed by 18 groups, they call on the government to set up “a globally accepted framework for testing protocols for international travel.” The plea comes as the U.S. and U.K. are discussing virus protections aimed at reopening travel between the two countries.

Traffic on most international routes has fallen dramatically since the pandemic emerged across the world in March.

“Coordinated and deliberate action must be taken to safely reopen the international travel market,” the letter said. “A collaborative approach between governments and industry will help to ensure the development of standardized measures that promote needed consistency

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American Airlines attendant gives Black Lives Matter note to travel influencer

This flight attendant made sure that one of his passengers felt truly supported.

On Tuesday, travel influencer Kellee Edwards was flying in first class when she received a “meaningful” note from her American Airlines flight attendant.

Edwards, who hosts the Travel Channel’s television series “Mysterious Islands,” posted a picture of the note on social media.

FIGHT ON CANADIAN PLANE OVER CHILD REFUSING TO WEAR MASK CANCELS FLIGHT

The message was written as a postscript on a generic card for first class passengers on American Airlines flights. The note, written by flight attendant John McCullough said: “I see you. You matter. Black lives matter.”

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On Twitter, Edwards said the note made a big difference to her.

“Now THIS is customer service,” she tweeted. “Such a simple gesture, but BEYOND meaningful. To simply be seen, in today’s climate and world. I may or

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Chinese airlines’ losses mitigated by domestic travel

China’s biggest airline on Saturday reported less severe losses in the second quarter as domestic travel picks up with the coronavirus outbreak brought largely under control.



a person standing in front of a plane: China Southern Airlines reported a lower loss in the second quarter and said the aviation market in China would be the first to rebound from the pandemic


© GREG BAKER
China Southern Airlines reported a lower loss in the second quarter and said the aviation market in China would be the first to rebound from the pandemic

The country where the disease first emerged last year has reported no new deaths since May — allowing for a tentative return of business and tourist travel within its borders, even as the virus wreaks havoc elsewhere.

China Southern Airlines, the nation’s largest carrier in terms of passenger numbers, posted losses of 2.9 billion yuan ($422 million) in April-June, compared with 5.3 billion yuan in the first quarter from January to March.

“The Covid-19 pandemic has exerted a long-term and profound impact globally,” the company said in its results announcement, predicting further uncertainty.

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What airlines are doing to help keep you safe

Because of coronavirus pandemic and the resulting quarantine, the airline industry has taken a major hit. In order to stay above water, most airlines in the U.S. have restructured their schedules and created new guidelines with pandemic safety in mind, in order to make potential travelers feel more confident to get on board. As of mid-July, domestic flights have been flying at about 50 percent seating capacity, but there are some airlines who have thrown caution to the wind and are still flying packed. If we choose to fly right now, how safe we feel will depend on each airline’s unique approach (if any at all) to social distancing, cleaning, and capacity. Here are the safety measures 6 major U.S. airlines currently have in place that might help you decide if you want to take the risk.

Southwest Airlines

I hold a special place in my heart for Southwest Airlines,

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Airlines end row with government over quarantine rules

Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty

British Airways (IAG.L), easyJet (EZJ.L) and Ryanair (RYAAY) will end a legal challenge against the UK government after it announced certain countries would be exempt from its quarantine rule.

Europe’s top airlines were worried the rule, implemented 8 June, would deter British holidaymakers from travelling, for fear of having to quarantine for 14 days upon return.

All passengers – bar a handful of exemptions – have to fill out an online locator form giving their contact and travel details, as well as the address of where they will isolate.

People who failed to comply were told they could be fined £1,000 ($1248.40) and police were allowed to use “reasonable force” to make sure the rules were followed.

The airlines had taken action against Health Secretary Matt Hancock over measures they said would have a “severe impact on the travel and tourism industry,” which was “already running on fumes.”

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Google Is Providing Search Data to Air France, Lufthansa, Other Airlines Looking to Decide Which Routes to Restart

Google is rolling out a new tool that provides airline partners with search data that carriers are using to help decide which routes to restart and when.

Unlike existing data from Google for airlines about their own performance across Google products, the newly provided data provides a market-wide view of consumer intent based on flight searches regardless of airline.

Lufthansa and Air France were two partners willing to go on the record about their use of the tool, which is a supplement to performance information already existing in the Google Flights Reporting Center, and airlines’ own data resources.

Dozens of airlines and online travel agencies, and more recently hotels and car rental firms in every region of the world are using the new data tool, Demand Explorer, according to Gianni Marostica, Google’s managing director of business development for travel. He spoke Thursday with Skift exclusively about the new tool, which

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In Fine Print, Airlines Make It Harder to Fight for Passenger Rights

Free antibacterial wipes are available at LaGuardia Airport in New York on June 10, 2020. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)
Free antibacterial wipes are available at LaGuardia Airport in New York on June 10, 2020. (Chang W. Lee/The New York Times)

As air travel reopens and flight bookings begin to creep up, AvGeeks — aviation geeks — and others may notice some new legalese in the fine print when they buy plane tickets.

More and more carriers are adding clauses that require passengers to settle disputes with the airline in private arbitration, rather than in court, and bar passengers from starting or joining class-action lawsuits.

In early April, American Airlines updated its contract of carriage, a standard industry document that outlines the legal responsibilities of a ticket holder and an airline, with a class-action waiver. British Airways followed in late May, adding a class-action waiver and binding arbitration agreement in the terms and conditions of Executive Club, its loyalty program, for residents of the United States and Canada. British Airways

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