A beginner’s guide to bicycles and getting started

From the best bike worth buying to the essential safety equipment you shouldn't leave home without, this is your go-to guide to cycling: iStock
From the best bike worth buying to the essential safety equipment you shouldn’t leave home without, this is your go-to guide to cycling: iStock

If you’re feeling a little restless with your exercise regimen and want to try something new, try cycling.

Not only will it keep you fit, but it’ll also help you get the most out of your time outdoors and explore your local area.

Sam Jones from Cycling UK told The Independent: “Cycling remains one of the best in terms of safely maintaining social distancing.”

Aside from a form of exercise, as lockdown restrictions ease and people start returning to work, cycling is also being encouraged by the government as a better mode of transport – along with driving. It’s a good way to avoid coming into close contact with people as people do on buses, trains and Tubes.

As part of the government’s plans to boost

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How Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Became the Busiest in the World

While the air travel industry is facing numerous declines during the pandemic, one unexpected upturn has surfaced: a new busiest airport in the world. For the first time in recent memory, Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport is now operating more flights than any other on the planet.

In fact, for three months in a row the Texas hub has had the most takeoffs and landings around the globe. Starting in May, the airport climbed to the top ranking, with 22,831 airline takeoffs and landings, according to data from the Federal Aviation Administration. That was enough to edge out some typically busier hubs in the U.S.—including Atlanta, Denver, Charlotte, and Chicago O’Hare—for the number one spot. DFW topped those same airports in June with 25,294 takeoffs and landings, according to the FAA’s data.

“I’ve connected through DFW a few times during the COVID outbreak,” says Ryan Ewing, founder and president of Airline

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New hotel hopes to court Hudson Valley ‘makers’

HUDSON — The Maker Hotel was meant to open here in late March or early April. The coronavirus pandemic, of course, prevented that from happening.

But as the hotel prepares for its grand opening next week after about five years of development, its owners hope it can serve as a safe and healthy place for artists, writers and other creative minds to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city.

The opening of the hotel marks the latest hip addition to the city of Hudson. Lev Glazman, one of the hotel’s co-founders, said Hudson’s diversity and eccentricity made it an irresistible draw for the project.

“There’s a very cool and amazing atmosphere and energy in Hudson,” Glazman said. “It’s very, very diverse. There’s a lot of creative energy here — the whole Hudson Valley area.  There’s something electric, and the people who live here feel very connected to

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A Canadian man set out on a solo sail around the world in October. He returned 9 months later in the middle of a pandemic.



a man in a boat on a body of water: Sailing ships sit at anchor as dawn breaks outside the harbor in Victoria, British Columbia, on June 23, 2005. REUTERS/Andy Clark AC/CN


© REUTERS/Andy Clark AC/CN
Sailing ships sit at anchor as dawn breaks outside the harbor in Victoria, British Columbia, on June 23, 2005. REUTERS/Andy Clark AC/CN

A Canadian man who set out on a solo sail 267 days ago returned to land earlier this month to a much different world than he left.

Bert terHart, a public speaker and IT entrepreneur, set sail from Victoria, British Columbia, in October, making a months-long trip around the world via the five Capes —  South Cape in New Zealand, South East and Cape Leeuwin in Australia, Cape Agulhas in South Africa, and Cape Horn in Chile — with no aid from electronic navigational devices.

He arrived home on July 18, in a world hit by the novel coronavirus pandemic. He had seen COVID-19 restrictions first-hand during a stop in Rarotonga, the largest of the Cook Islands, in May, but didn’t fully know what

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Five Democratic candidates battle for two House District seats in northern Miami-Dade County

An open Aug. 18 primary with no Republican candidates running will decide which Democrats will represent House District 107 and House District 108 in northern Miami-Dade County.

Two Democrats are seeking to replace term-limited incumbent Barbara Watson in House District 107, which runs from North Miami to Miami Gardens.

And in House District 108, which covers parts of Miami-Dade County that include Biscayne Park, Miami Shores and part of downtown Miami, incumbent Dotie Joseph is looking to fend off two challengers — including the former state representative she defeated in the 2018 primary.

The novel coronavirus has forced the candidates to find non-traditional ways to reach voters in the predominantly Black districts, both of which lean heavily Democratic. Some candidates are using technology to host virtual events. Others are placing door hangers and fliers outside of voters’ houses — but staying socially distant — and one candidate is using a

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New UK quarantine rules shake up summer travel plans

The Lunt family from Bath, in western England, had planned to visit Spain this summer but like so many British holidaymakers have had their plans upended by the coronavirus pandemic.

The family-of-five, who had booked two weeks on the Balearic island of Majorca next month, are now headed to Rock, an upmarket resort in the southwest English county Cornwall dubbed “Chelsea-on-Sea” after the wealthy London suburb.

They finally decided to swap the azure waters of the Mediterranean for the cooler currents of the North Atlantic amid growing fears about a second wave of COVID-19 sweeping Europe.

Initially, the family were worried they might test positive for the virus on arrival in Spain and have to spend their holiday in self-isolation, before the British government abruptly imposed its own quarantine.

“We were worried about having our temperature taken at the airport and potentially having to quarantine for two weeks,” Rosie Lunt,

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Calabasas Mayor Pens Letter To Community

Calabasas Mayor Alicia Weintraub recently penned a letter to the community. The letter in its entirety is below:

Another week of summer has gone by and tomorrow we move into the month of August. Everybody thought we would be farther along in the journey to dealing with COVID-19, but the question we all wish we had the answer to is when will all of this be over?

One thing however is very clear and that is we all need to work together to get this virus under control. Getting our numbers down will allow schools to open more quickly and businesses to resume more normal operations. I am sure the goal of returning to normal is something that we can all agree on

The one thing that we can all do to help fight COVID-19 in Calabasas is to wear a face covering. I don’t mean to sound like a

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Planning a Ride in a National Park? Here’s What You Need to Know

Photo credit: Courtesy Micah Ling
Photo credit: Courtesy Micah Ling

From Bicycling

For many cyclists, there are few things better than long and winding roads, minimal car traffic at low speed limits, and incredible views of nature. And at many U.S. national parks, this is just the case.

After closing in response to the coronavirus outbreak, most national parks have reopened to the public, with several safety precautions in place. And one way that people are especially encouraged to enjoy the parks right now is to do it on bike.

Cynthia Hernandez, the public affairs specialist at the U.S. National Park Service Office of Public Affairs, says that some national parks, like Yosemite in California and Acadia in Maine, are very popular among cyclists. But there’s plenty of great biking to be had at lesser-known parks as well—Hernandez suggests checking out Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas, Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, Mojave National Preserve

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Here’s how to stay safe in the water, according to a former lifeguard

According to the CDC, an average of 3,536 people unintentionally drown every year — that’s roughly ten per day.

As a former lifeguard, swim and CPR instructor, I’ve been schooled in the nuances of water safety. Here’s what you need to know to keep your family safe at the lake, beach, and pool this summer.

What does drowning look like?

Unlike what you might see on TV, drowning may not involve screams, thrashing or hand signals. Look for a weak or inefficient kick, attempts to reach for the edge, and neutral or negative buoyancy.

What can you do if you think someone may be drowning? Experts recommend throwing anything that floats to the person. It could be a life jacket, swim noodle, or even an empty cooler with the top closed. 

“This is why ocean lifeguards use rescue buoys and tubes,” explains B. Chris Brewster, Chair of the National Certification

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Fan Recommendations for Traveling and Camping

Fan recommendations for Traveling and Camping. Traveling and camping activities certainly can’t just stop in hot weather. Just prepare yourself so that the tour agenda continues to run smoothly and comfortably despite the intense sunlight.

Even if forced to undergo outdoor tourist activities during hot weather, prepare yourself and bring supplies, equipment that must be worn like sunglasses, wearing sunscreen, carrying and wearing hats, carrying the best fan for camping tents, wearing comfortable casual clothes, and no need to use excessive makeup.

The use of a fan is one easy way to get fresher air. Fans are commonly used when the weather is hot. Various models of fans are offered in the market with a variety of prices and functions.

The fan is a device that is often used to help air circulation so it is not stuffy.

With the help of a fan, then you will not feel … Read More