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Latest on the worldwide spread of the coronavirus

(Reuters) – Alabama, Florida and North Carolina in the United States reported record daily increases in deaths from COVID-19 on Tuesday, while the Federal Reserve said the U.S. economy would recover more slowly than expected.

DEATHS AND INFECTIONS

* For an interactive graphic tracking the global spread, open https://tmsnrt.rs/3aIRuz7 in an external browser.

* For a U.S.-focused tracker with state-by-state and county map, open https://tmsnrt.rs/2w7hX9T in an external browser.

* Eikon users, see MacroVitals (cpurl://apps.cp./cms/?navid=1592404098) for a case tracker and a summary of developments.

EUROPE

* France will make it compulsory for people to wear masks in shops and other enclosed public spaces from next month.

* Spain’s populous Catalonia region made a fresh attempt to put an area of 160,000 people under lockdown to stem the latest local coronavirus surge.

AMERICAS

* U.S. President Donald Trump lambasted California’s two largest school districts for making students learn from home for

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Coronavirus: latest global developments

Here are the latest developments in the coronavirus crisis:

– India locks down millions –

The northern Indian state of Bihar, which has a population of around 125 million people, will go into lockdown on Thursday for 15 days, the local government says.

The announcement comes as the southern city and IT hub Bangalore, home to more than 13 million people, begins a week-long lockdown at 8:00 pm (1430 GMT).

– 570,000+ deaths –

The pandemic has killed at least 574,278 people worldwide since it surfaced in China late last year, according to an AFP tally at 1900 GMT on Tuesday based on official sources.

The United States is the worst-hit country with 136,113 deaths. It is followed by Brazil (72,833), Britain (44,968), Mexico (35,491) and Italy (34,984).

– UK slump –

Britain’s economy contracted by almost one-fifth during the country’s lockdown and remains set for its sharpest decline in

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U.S. Government Backs Down On In-Person Requirement This Fall

Harvard University sued the federal government to block sa proposed rule change that would have required foreign students to take some in-person classes this fall. File photo

Coronavirus cases are climbing across the country. Multiple states have sued. Universities, from the big names to the small, have voiced their opposition, and in some cases gone to court.

Now the government of Donald Trump is backing down from a rule change that would have required international students in the United States to take some in-person classes or risk having their visas revoked. The rule also would have barred foreign students from entry to the country if they planned to attend programs that will be entirely online this fall.

One day after 17 states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit in U.S. district court in Boston, Massachusetts, seeking to block the rule change — and less than a week after

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‘Census Caravan’ To Parade Through Aurora Wednesday

AURORA, IL — Aurora officials are set to embark on a mini parade Wednesday afternoon to encourage city residents to fill out the U.S. Census.

The “Census Caravan” is scheduled to travel through several city neighborhoods with lower census-completion rates to encourage residents to fill out the 2020 Census to ensure they are accounted for when federal and state lawmakers allocate funding and make long-term decisions.

One Month Later, Aurora Police-Complaint Portal Remains Offline

The parade, which is set to start at noon, will feature 10 Aurora city vehicles with lights flashing and horns and sirens blaring “to literally make some noise about the importance of completing the 2020 Census,” officials said in a new release.

Police Drop Decal Company After Owner’s Racist, Homophobic Posts

“This is an energetic way to remind some of our lowest response areas to complete the Census,” Aurora Mayor Richard Irvin said in the release.

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Trump administration drops plan to deport international students in online-only classes

Two of the country’s top universities won a major victory over the Trump administration on Tuesday, after the government agreed to halt its plan to deport international college students who only use online courses to study this fall.

The decision marks a stunning retreat for the Trump administration, which left schools and students reeling following a July 6 announcement that spurred lawsuits and condemnation from a growing list of states, schools, politicians, labor unions and tech sector giants. That included the powerful U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which announced it was “pleased that the Department of Homeland Security rescinded its ill-conceived policy regarding international students” following the decision.

Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology sued both DHS and Immigration and Customs Enforcement last week, days after the government warned schools it would begin to reinstate tight restrictions on the number of online classes foreign students are allowed to take while

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Chainlink’s Interest, Ethereum’s ‘ReGenesis’ and Crypto Taxes

Binance announced the rollout of its crypto debit card, the U.K.’s central bank is thinking hard about a digital currency and the taxman cometh. Here’s the story:

You’re reading Blockchain Bites, the daily roundup of the most pivotal stories in blockchain and crypto news, and why they’re significant. You can subscribe to this and all of CoinDesk’s newsletters here. 

Top shelf

AML Compliance
BitGo is offering API support for the Financial Action Task Force’s (FATF) “Travel Rule,” which stipulates the originators and beneficiaries of financial transactions over $1,000 be identified and that their personal data must “travel” with those transactions. BitGo’s offering seeks to remove the headache of identifying wallets and transferring personally identifiable information between clients that use the San Francisco-based firm’s technology or custodial services.

Related: First Mover: Bitcoiners Not Worried Fed Money Printer Has Stopped Going ‘Brrrr’

Binance Card
Binance has announced the first major rollout

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Ghislaine Maxwell Is Denied Bail After Pleading Not Guilty in Epstein Sex Trafficking Ring Charges

Mark Mainz/Getty Images
Mark Mainz/Getty Images

Jeffrey Epstein’s accused madam, Ghislaine Maxwell, was denied bail Tuesday after she pleaded not guilty to recruiting and grooming underage girls in the financier’s sex-trafficking scheme.

On Tuesday afternoon, Maxwell appeared at the arraignment, initial scheduling conference and bail hearing remotely via video conference from the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn.

U.S. District Judge Alison J. Nathan set Maxwell’s trial for July 12, 2021. Assistant U.S. prosecutor Alison Moe said the trial would take two weeks, including another week set aside for jury selection.

Moe said discovery in the case would include search warrant returns, subpoena returns including business records, photographs and searches from electronic devices. It also will include prior investigative files from the FBI, relating to Epstein’s 2007 criminal case in the Southern District of Florida.

Maxwell was arrested July 2 at a luxurious New Hampshire hideaway she’d purchased for nearly $1 million in cash

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Loss of international students could damage US economy, experts say, as Trump seeks visa restrictions

The world of higher education, already struggling to cope amid the COVID-19 pandemic, was rocked last week when the Trump administration issued a regulation that would prevent international students from entering the country in addition to compelling thousands already in the U.S. to leave if enrolled in schools that plan to teach exclusively online in the fall.

“These students and their families have invested so much hope and money — in some cases, their families’ life savings — to get an American education,” Kavita Daiya, an associate professor of English at George Washington University, told ABC News. “By being here, they bring so much talent and knowledge to our communities. To force them to leave is to betray the promise of opportunity and fairness that undergirds American higher education.”

It could also cost the U.S. tens of billions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

MORE: Harvard, MIT sue Trump administration

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Opening border could ‘waste’ Canada’s efforts, vaccine may not be available until 2021, health official warns

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 107,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 14

1:15 p.m.: Spikes in COVID-19 cases ‘almost inevitable’

Dr. Howard Njoo, Canada’s deputy chief public health officer, said

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11 of the biggest myths about coronavirus, according to the World Health Organisation

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Ever since the coronavirus pandemic began making headlines across the world, there has been confusing and sometimes conflicting advice. Should we wear masks, should we not; does wearing gloves help; can the virus be spread from pets to humans – the list goes on.

Despite the plethora of information about the Covid-19 outbreak, the main guidance has largely remained the same for several months, albeit with slight updates: maintain social distancing guidelines, wash your hands thoroughly and regularly, and isolate at home if you start exhibiting symptoms including a high fever; a new, continuous cough or a loss or changed sense of smell and taste.

Amid the guidelines issued by governments and health organisations, myths concerning the virus have also been spreading, making it difficult for some members of the public to discern truth from fiction.

On the website for the World Health Organisation (WHO), it lists some

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