Travel

Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders

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An Easy, No-Frills Option for Online Banking

Although the word “bank” was once synonymous with a physical location, the reality is that more and more banks occupy only digital space. Varo, founded in 2015, is one of the many options available to today’s bankers — if they’re willing to forgo the ability to visit an actual bank building, that is.

Like other online-only banks, Varo offers deposit and checking accounts with low fees and high interest-earning rates, making it an attractive alternative to more traditional banking.

However, Varo doesn’t offer small business banking, credit cards, loans, or other extras that may be necessary for some customers, and the way it handles cash deposits is clunky and costly.

If you’re in the market for a new personal bank account, read on to learn whether or not Varo might be a fit.

In this review:

Varo Bank Review: The Pros and Cons

Here’s what we loved about Varo —

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Keeping COVID-19 outside of camps is a near impossible challenge

As summer camps across the country debated whether and how to operate during the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Kanakuk Kamps, a prominent network of Christian sports camps in Missouri, announced its five overnight camps would open to over 20,000 kids starting May 30.

“Our full-time summer staff of 1,600 qualified individuals including 100 registered nurses and 60 volunteer doctors are hired and sitting on ready,” Joe White, who runs the camp with his wife Debbie-Jo, told families. “We are planning on being open all summer.”

On their website the camp assured parents “We are focused on taking all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our Kamps.”

But now even cautious hopes that COVID-19 might be kept outside Kanakuk Kamps’ gates are already dashed. On July 1, parents were notified by email that one of the camps, known as K-2, was shutting down. The Stone County Health Department’

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What are Hongkongers going to do with their HK$10,000 payout? Bet on the stock market, from the looks of it

Starting this week, each permanent resident of Hong Kong will be eligible to receive HK$10,000 (US$1,290) in a one-time cash payout, part of the government’s HK$55 billion financial stimulus to help the city survive its worst recession on record.

Hong Kong’s Financial Secretary Paul Chan Mo-po, the architect of the financial disbursement, would prefer the city’s residents to spend that money dining out, shopping, travel locally or pay for their utility bills. Chances are that Hongkongers will redirect that money towards the stock market, where they can put it to better use in one of Asia’s cheapest bourses, and to subscribe for two dozen initial public offerings (IPOs) in the pipeline.

“I will use it to invest in the stock market at the right time,” said Irene Chan, a white-collar professional working in the Central business district. “HK$10,000 is not a large sum of money. My aim is to double

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Done with Facebook? Consider MeWe, Parler or old standbys such as LinkedIn

MeWe is a social network that says it has no ads, spyware, targeting, political bias, or newsfeed manipulation. In other words, it bills itself as the “anti” Facebook. 

Parler is a social media app with one point of view: conservative. It’s a place for folks who don’t like the spin at Facebook, or as it describes itself, “free expression without violence and a lack of censorship.”

So maybe, like Coca-Cola, Unilver, Starbucks and other corporations, you’ve had it with Facebook and its policies about either not curbing hate speech, or if you’re on the other side of the aisle, censoring free thought. 

Where to go? We have some ideas for you. 

MeWe bills itself as the "anti-Facebook."
MeWe bills itself as the “anti-Facebook.”

Controversy: Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

Social: Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

LinkedIn

Yes, that network that for years was thought of

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Airlines end row with government over quarantine rules

Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty

British Airways (IAG.L), easyJet (EZJ.L) and Ryanair (RYAAY) will end a legal challenge against the UK government after it announced certain countries would be exempt from its quarantine rule.

Europe’s top airlines were worried the rule, implemented 8 June, would deter British holidaymakers from travelling, for fear of having to quarantine for 14 days upon return.

All passengers – bar a handful of exemptions – have to fill out an online locator form giving their contact and travel details, as well as the address of where they will isolate.

People who failed to comply were told they could be fined £1,000 ($1248.40) and police were allowed to use “reasonable force” to make sure the rules were followed.

The airlines had taken action against Health Secretary Matt Hancock over measures they said would have a “severe impact on the travel and tourism industry,” which was “already running on fumes.”

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End of the runway for 747 jumbo as Boeing placed final part orders

By Eric M. Johnson

SEATTLE (Reuters) – Boeing Co <BA.N> and suppliers set the final number of parts it would need for the 747 jumbo jet program at least a year ago, signaling the end for a plane that democratized global air travel in the 1970s but fell behind modern twin-engine aircraft, industry sources said on Friday.

Boeing’s “Queen of the Skies”, the world’s most easily recognized jetliner with its humped fuselage and four engines, marked its 50-year flying anniversary in February 2019, clinging to life thanks to a cargo market boom fueled by online shopping.

But the end for the program has been hanging in the air for years amid falling orders and pricing pressure. The coronavirus pandemic has also crushed passenger travel and demand for new jets.

The last order for a passenger version came in 2017, when the U.S. government asked Boeing to repurpose two 747-8 jetliners

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Five ways Hong Kong has changed under China’s security law

Hong Kong (AFP) – Beijing’s new national security law for Hong Kong is the most radical shift in how the semi-autonomous city is run since it was handed back to China by Britain in 1997.

China’s authoritarian leaders say the powers will restore stability after a year of pro-democracy protests and will not stifle freedoms.

But it has already sent fear coursing through a city used to being able to speak openly and fundamentally altered the city’s relationship to both Beijing and the outside world.

– Legal firewall toppled –

A key pillar of Hong Kong’s success has been an independent judiciary, insulated from mainland China’s party-controlled courts and their conviction rates of around 99 percent.

That legal firewall has now come down.

The law grants China jurisdiction in some national security cases and allows mainland security agents to set up shop openly in the city for the first time.

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Will I be able to go skiing next winter? A country-by-country guide to Covid restrictions in ski resorts as travel corridors introduced

skier - gaudenz danuser
skier – gaudenz danuser

Ski holidays in Europe are set to be back in business next winter as the government brings in list of 59 quarantine-free destinations

The government has today released a ‘safe list’ of quarantine-exempt destinations, allowing international holidays to kickstart from July 10.

This list of 59 countries banishes the need for travellers visiting the named nations, which are deemed as low risk, to quarantine on arrival home in the UK, news many have been waiting for for months – although the destination itself could still impose a quarantine.

While initially the announcement of these ‘travel corridors’ will provide a lifeline to summer holidays and operators, it also shines a ray of hope on next season’s ski holidays, with the majority of winter destinations in Europe, plus Japan, named as safe.

The list lifts the Foreign Office ban on non-essential travel to all the named destinations from

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