Recreation

Westport Again Issues Warning About Possible Beach Closures

WESTPORT, CT — As with last weekend, Westport officials said on Friday that the town’s beaches might be closed at certain times this weekend if there is overcrowding and social distancing cannot be maintained.

The potential closures are the result of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, and residents who want to spend the day at Compo or Burying Hill beaches this weekend “are advised to arrive before 10 a.m.,” officials said.

Masks are required on the Compo Beach boardwalk, sidewalks, at the restrooms and when social distancing cannot be maintained.

The town’s announcement is below:

Residents are reminded once again that weekend traffic and possible overcrowding at town beaches may result in early closure. In an abundance of caution and to insure public health and safety during the COVID-19 pandemic, when the beach reaches a capacity where it is deemed impossible to maintain social distancing, it will be closed to additional

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Trash, Illegal Parking, More Plague Wissahickon As Visitors Surge

PHILADELPHIA — Wissahickon Valley Park has been seeing more visitors since March as people stay in the Philadelphia area amid the coronavirus pandemic.

But with increased visitors comes increased trash and debris, swimming in prohibited areas, illegal parking, and a lack of social distancing.

With that in mind, the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation will dispatch social distance ambassadors to Wissahickon Valley Park this weekend to welcome visitors and educate them on safe and responsible park usage.

The ambassadors will maintain a presence at popular entrances to the park and trailheads.

Philadelphia Parks & Recreation’s Park Rangers are on duty at the Wissahickon and other watershed parks to remind residents that swimming in Philadelphia’s rivers, streams, and waterways is prohibited and extremely dangerous—even for the most experienced swimmers. Jumping into these bodies of water from any height can cause serious injury or death.

Additionally, gatherings of 50 people or more are

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As ADA turns 30, finding just-right mobility for the disabled is a challenge

We cover all kinds of mobility at Autoblog, not always just cars, and this weekend we’re noting the 30th anniversary of one of the landmark laws of our age, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). President George H.W. Bush signed the ADA on June 26, 1990. Years later, he himself became disabled with Parkinson’s disease. At some point in our lives, many of us will confront a disability and will benefit from the sweeping changes and rights secured by the ADA, but unlike Bush, disability can sometimes strike when we’re young. As it did to my wife.

Alicia’s ability to walk has degenerated. At first, she used a cane, then trekking poles, then a “rollator,” one of those walker-like frames with wheels. But she was losing the ability to use even those. About two years ago, we reluctantly and grimly started shopping for wheelchairs. 

Now, if you haven’t known

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Trash, Illegal Parking, More Plague Wissahickon As VisitorsSurge

PHILADELPHIA — Wissahickon Valley Park has been seeing more visitors since March as people stay in the Philadelphia area amid the coronavirus pandemic.

But with increased visitors comes increased trash and debris, swimming in prohibited areas, illegal parking, and a lack of social distancing.

With that in mind, the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation will dispatch social distance ambassadors to Wissahickon Valley Park this weekend to welcome visitors and educate them on safe and responsible park usage.

The ambassadors will maintain a presence at popular entrances to the park and trailheads.

Philadelphia Parks & Recreation’s Park Rangers are on duty at the Wissahickon and other watershed parks to remind residents that swimming in Philadelphia’s rivers, streams, and waterways is prohibited and extremely dangerous—even for the most experienced swimmers. Jumping into these bodies of water from any height can cause serious injury or death.

Additionally, gatherings of 50 people or more are

Read More

19 TV shows that found a second wind after they ended

The cast of "Friends."
The cast of “Friends.”

Reisig & Taylor/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images via Getty Image

  • These TV shows found new life after they ended, whether by cancellation or not. 

  • “Friends” was one of the most popular shows on Netflix in 2018 — more than 20 years after it premiered.

  • The strong DVD sales of “Firefly” led to a follow-up film.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Whether they ran for several successful seasons or were canceled after one, these TV shows found a second wind and renewed popularity after they ended. For example, even though it’s been off the air for 16 years, “Friends” is more popular than ever.

Here are 19 shows that found renewed popularity after their end.

“The Office” was the most popular show on Netflix in 2018, five years after it ended in 2013.

"The Office."
“The Office.”

NBC

Michael Scott would be proud. It was the most-watched

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S Korea baseball, soccer fans to return to games

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea will allow baseball fans to return to the stands beginning Sunday under a phased process planned by health authorities to bring back spectators in professional sports amid the COVID-19 epidemic.

Officials said Friday that spectators can begin attending professional soccer games matches Aug. 1. However, professional golf tournaments will continue without galleries at least until late August.

Teams initially will be allowed to sell tickets for only 10% of the seats. Fans will be screened for fevers and required to sit apart and to wear masks. They will be banned from eating food and drinking beer, and discouraged from excessive shouting, singing and cheering.

South Korea’s baseball and soccer leagues returned to action in May without fans in the stands.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump administration’s $21 million gamble on heartburn medication as virus remedy fizzles.

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Coronavirus clusters still popping up in China

BEIJING — Chinese officials have reported two confirmed coronavirus cases in a northeastern province as China continues to see infection clusters develop even though it has largely contained the virus in most of the country.

Authorities in Liaoning province have closed theaters, night clubs and indoor tourist attractions trying to stem further infections.

The Liaoning infections mark China’s latest cluster after one in the far northwestern region of Xinjiang earlier this month. That outbreak, focused on the regional capital of Urumqi, has infected dozens of people and officials have curbed travel and ordered widespread testing.

Elsewhere, China has largely contained the virus, with major cities such as Beijing and Shanghai opening up to increased economic activity and social interaction.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump administration’s $21 million gamble on heartburn medication as virus remedy fizzles.

— Virus sends jobless claims u p

Read More

Some CA counties set fines for virus violations

LOS ANGELES — California counties are stepping up enforcement of public health orders as hospitalizations and positive tests for the coronavirus skyrocket in many parts of the state.

In the San Francisco Bay area, officials in Marin and Napa counties have approved fines ranging from $25 to $500 for individuals violating public health orders, including failing to wear masks. Supervisors in nearby Sonoma County will consider a similar move.

The virus continues to surge in many parts of California, topping 425,600 confirmed cases. There were 157 deaths Thursday, the highest reported in a single day.

Gov. Gavin Newsom called it a “grim milestone.”

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump administration’s $21 million gamble on heartburn medication as virus remedy fizzles.

— Virus sends jobless claims u p for first time since March

— White House drops its bid for payroll tax cut in

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Kansas AG, gov clash over mask order for schools

TOPEKA, Kan. — Kansas’ attorney general says he believes both counties and local school districts can exempt themselves from the governor’s order requiring schools to have staff and students wear masks because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Attorney General Derek Schmidt Schmidt said Thursday a state law on the pandemic enacted in June allows counties to opt out of the order and the state constitution gives local school districts the authority to do the same.

Gov. Laura Kelly replied in a scathing statement calling Schmidt wrong and accusing him of creating “more hurdles and uncertainty” during the pandemic.

Kelly issued her masks-in-schools order Monday, imposing rules that are stricter than guidelines set by the State Board of Education.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump administration’s $21 million gamble on heartburn medication as virus remedy fizzles.

— Virus sends jobless claims u p for first

Read More

Medford Updates Policies For Wright’s Pond, Tufts Pool

MEDFORD, MA — The Medford Recreation Department announced new regulations for Wright’s Pond and Tufts Pool in August, based on expanded guidance from the state and feedback from residents and staff about pond and pool operations.

Starting in August, the Recreation Department will make the following adjustments:

  • Reservations can be made in two hour time slots (three two-hour time slots will be available for each day). Three blocks of two hours will be available, rather than the current three-hour blocks. This time change will allow us to accommodate more people per day.

  • Capacity at Wright’s Pond will be increased to 60 people per block. This will allow a total of 180 residents each day to access the pond as opposed to the current 100 per day. The pool will also be increased to 40 people per day. In total, 300 people will be able to visit these facilities each day.

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